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Ed Kramer keeps Gwinnett deputies hopping with grievances

DragonCon founder is a "whiner of some magnitude" says Gwinnett sheriff

DragonCon co-founder Ed Kramer has been a busy man. A news story that aired a month ago on WAGA-TV showed that Kramer was inundating the Gwinnett Sheriff’s office with complaints, grievances and requests—three a day, on average—as he sits in jail awaiting trial on child molestation charges. Today, an AJC article suggests he’s still at it.

Kramer, 52, has been under lock and key in Gwinnett since being extradited in January from Connecticut, where he was arrested on charges of child endangerment for sharing a hotel room with a 14-year-old boy in violation of his Georgia bond.

As soon as he was back in the Gwinnett jail, Kramer began filing formal complaints, many of which involve claims that he’s being denied the right to practice his brand of Orthodox Judaism. His requests for turkey sandwiches, religious candles and his own typewriter have all been rejected—but not before being reviewed by a deputy, a process that can often consume several man-hours of research time.

Not content with working through the jail’s grievance system, Kramer also has filed a lawsuit against the jail over many of the same issues. From the AJC:

“He appears to be a whiner of some magnitude, but that’s just my opinion,” said Sheriff Butch Conway. “It’s got to the point it’s harassment with my staff.”

Gwinnett County District Attorney Danny Porter said Kramer appears to be manipulating the system.

“We’re obligated by federal law and our own liability coverage that we have to follow up on every complaint, and he knows that,” Porter said. “There’s no question that it can be used for harassment.”

When last we heard from Porter, he was still attempting to schedule a new medical exam for Kramer in order to prove that the defendant has been faking many of the life-threatening ailments that have so far kept him from standing trial. Porter plans to call witnesses to say they saw Kramer—who typically appears in court in a wheelchair using an oxygen tank—hiking around rural movie sets carrying camera equipment.