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Author Steve Fennessy

  • Steve Fennessy

    Editor

    A native of Auburn, New York, Steve Fennessy's first journalism job was delivering his hometown newspaper. After graduating from American University, he became an intern at that same newspaper, was named business reporter, and then finally city editor. In 1996, he moved to Cairo, Egypt, where he worked as a reporter until 1999, when he became a features writer at the Democrat & Chronicle newspaper in Rochester, New York. The following year, he fled the frigid Northeast for Atlanta to be with his girlfriend, Christy, who is now his wife and the mother of their two boys, Casey and Jack. In Atlanta, Fennessy spent five years at Creative Loafing as news editor and senior writer. He joined Atlanta magazine as articles editor in 2005. Fennessy's stories have won awards from the City and Regional Magazine Association, the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, and the New York State Associated Press Association. His 2006 story for Atlanta magazine "The Talented Dr. Krist" was featured in the 2007 edition of the Best American Crime Writing. In 2006, he was named a Knight-Wallace fellow at the University of Michigan, where he held the Mike Wallace Fellowship for Investigative Reporting during the 2006–07 academic year.

 

WWTPT? (What Would Tyler Perry Trademark?)

Imagining what could be next for the the actor-director who just trademarked WWJD

As further evidence that he always gets what he wants (well, everything except an Oscar), Atlanta film mogul and Caribbean island owner Tyler Perry has won a trademark battle over the phrase “What Would Jesus Do?” This despite the fact that the other party, Kimberly Kearney, reportedly filed for the trademark months before Perry ever did. No, Tyler Perry did not coin this phrase. (Nor did Kearney.) But evidently, according to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, that doesn’t matter. It occurred to us that this could be the beginning of an avalanche of applications with the Trademark Office by Perry and his sycophants. Heck, if he can have “What Would Jesus Do?”, it’s only a matter of time before he attaches his name to other phrases. And so, we can expect the following soon: Read more...

The Center for Civil and Human Rights connects Atlanta legacy and current conflicts

Notes from a preview visit to the national center, which opens to the public June 23

As its name suggests, the Center for Civil and Human Rights, which opens to the public on Monday, is about two struggles—the American one that was fought primarily in the South in the latter half of the twentieth century, and the worldwide one that involves oppressed peoples in distant (and not-so-distant) lands. While there’s an obvious thematic linkage between the American Civil Rights Movement and the broader human rights one, the line between them must have been a challenge for the Center’s designers to straddle. One has a built-in narrative, with a beginning and middle (if not yet an ending), and the other requires navigating the vast space beneath the human rights umbrella, whether it’s oppressed women in Africa, child laborers in Pakistan, or tortured activists in Burma. Read more...

City of Atlanta and the Braves: A Doomed Affair

The tale of star-crossed lovers in five acts and 600 stanzas (er, emails)

In reviewing the emails, one wonders, was the writing on the wall way back in October 2011, when the Braves outlined four options for the team’s future post-2016, when its existing lease would expire? Read more...

2014 will be big for downtown

But we still need a grocery store. And what did that guy from Cousins say about MARTA? (Update: Cousins exec clarifies remarks)

A.J. Robinson, the president of Central Atlanta Progress, this morning said the current “surge of activity” in downtown Atlanta is unlike anything the city has seen in decades. Read more...

Ed Kramer’s child molestation trial to begin Dec. 2

Plus, DragonCon’s divorce from Kramer appears to be final. Finally.

As his long-postponed trial date on child molestation charges approaches, Ed Kramer and DragonCon—the sci-fi convention he co-founded more than a quarter-century ago—have now severed all ties. As of noon today, according to DragonCon spokesman Greg Euston, an out-of-court settlement between Kramer and DragonCon went into effect in which DragonCon will pay Kramer for the shares he still held in the company—shares that entitled him to dividends and which prompted some longtime attendees to boycott the convention. Read more...