Drawing lines of Braves allegiance in Georgia

Yet another example of privacy invasion through Facebook

2 Comments

We often complain about Atlanta’s tepid sports fanbase—poor attendance, lack of passion, inability to hold on to a hockey franchise. But thanks to Facebook, that observation is now at least a little closer to being scientific fact. The New York Times recently took a page from the NSA and mined the social networking site for data on user baseball allegiance. The algorithm, which centered on how many users in a given ZIP code “like” a team’s Facebook page, resulted in a breathtakingly intricate color-coded map. The findings in Georgia are revealing.

It makes sense that cities, which attract out-of-state transplants, would generally have a weaker connection to the home team than the natives who tend to live just outside of the metro area. But on first glance, the pool of light-blue lukewarm Braves fans in and around the Perimeter seems relatively large amid the navy-blue sea of hardcore Choppers. Zooming in, there are other fun takeaways:

—The Braves are the undisputed Team of the South. The only competitors are the national brandwagons for the Yankees and Red Sox.

—Fifty-seven percent of fans in Turner Field’s 30315 ZIP root for the local boys.

—In the 30339 site of the new Cobb stadium: 64 percent.

In case you’re wondering, the highest metro percentage is seventy percent in the 30134 ZIP code; according to Facebook, the team should move to Douglasville.

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Comments

  1. ChopAttack

    April 24, 2014 at 8:15 pm

    It would be interesting to know the intensity level of interest. Harris Interactive does a poll every year on the most popular baseball teams and the Braves are in the top 3 nationally thanks to the TBS years.

    The Red Sox have moved into the 2nd spot thanks to recent success.

  2. Lovecraft3XX

    April 25, 2014 at 3:49 am

    What a stupid article. If one person within a specified zipcode with a Facebook account liked a team the percentage would be 100%. The microdata reveals little or nothing about say the desire of the people of Cobb County to use public tax dollars to fund a private for-profit corporation controlled by a plutocrat.