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Author Rebecca Burns

  • Rebecca Burns

    Deputy Editor & Digital Strategist

    Rebecca Burns is an Atlanta-based journalist, editor, and author.

    She served as editor-in-chief of Atlanta magazine from 2002-2009 and later spent several years as director of digital strategy for Emmis Publishing, working with editors and publishers in company’s family of city and regional magazines—which includes Atlanta, Los Angeles, and Texas Monthly.

    In fall 2012 she returned to Atlanta magazine to serve as deputy editor and digital strategist. She writes and edits feature articles and oversees special projects such as the annual Groundbreakers awards. She launched and manages the Daily Agenda blog and edits the companion section in the print magazine.

    Burns, whose own writing and reporting focus on civil rights and social and economic justice, is the author of three books. The latest, Burial for a King (Scribner, 2011), is account of the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination. Her next book—The Second Burning of Atlanta—will chronicle the Great Fire of 1917.

    Burns teaches journalism at Emory University and the University of Georgia and is a frequent speaker at colleges, schools, and civic organizations.

 

Will a mural transform the scary Boulevard Tunnel?

Not on its own. But it will be a big step in the right direction for improving walkability in Cabbagetown and Old Fourth Ward.

When I moved to Cabbagetown a couple of years ago, I quickly learned what it means to be “on the other side of the tracks.” Literally. For those of us who live south of the CSX and MARTA rail lines that slice through the heart of intown Atlanta, getting around can be problematic. Read More

Research news: A sod shortage, soil DNA, and direction-giving chimps

A roundup of studies, surveys, and experiments conducted by local universities

We don’t want to alarm y’all, but evidently there will be a Georgia sod shortage this year. Read More

Mayor Reed aims to reconnect Atlanta with Georgia's agrarian roots

Office of Sustainability drafted zoning changes to make it easier for urban farms to operate

Mayor Kasim Reed has grand ambitions for Atlanta—high-tech incubators, for instance. But his administration has another, more prosaic goal: to reconnect the city with Georgia’s agrarian roots. Read More

Report: Atlanta is the most sprawling big metro in the U.S.

A study released today by Smart Growth America looks at the impact of sprawl on healthy, safety, and economic opportunity

The study examined the correlation between sprawl and economic mobility. People who live in high-sprawl metro areas have lower rates of economic opportunity than those who live in more densely developed cities. “A low income person in a compact area has much better access to jobs,” said lead research Reid Ewing. Read More

Cape San Blas will rekindle your love for the Florida Panhandle

The "Forgotten Coast" provides quiet relaxation

“Well,” I said to my husband, “I don’t think I have ever dined out looking so grubby in my life—but I don’t remember when I last felt this relaxed.” With another swig from a bottle of PBR, I leaned back in the wooden bench on the wide front porch of Indian Pass Trading Post and listened as Kerry James, whose sun-streaked hair and leathered skin testified to decades of beach bumming, belted his way through “Sweet Caroline.” Read More