Saturday, July 21, 2018
Julia Mahood

At Georgia’s Arrendale State Prison, women inmates forge a bond by keeping bees

Master beekeeper Julia Mahood’s is the first female class in a statewide inmate beekeeping program that began in 2012. Now entering its third year, the facility’s beekeeping program is 25 women strong and provides students both a sense of community on the inside and the skills to start a career upon release.
Magnus Egerstedt

Georgia Tech’s Robotarium is “a shining beacon of robotic awesomeness”

The Robotarium is an open-access lab with swarm robots, or robots in large quantities. Palm-sized robots roll—and plate-sized ones fly in the middle of the room where anyone in the world can remotely run experiments on the lab’s robots, simply by uploading code to the Robotarium’s website.
Better Business

With Start:ME, Emory looks to connect Atlanta’s minority communities with startup know-how

"Entrepreneur accelerator” START:ME focuses on small-business owners in communities like Clarkston, East Lake, and Atlanta’s Southside. The Emory University Goizueta Business School’s 14-week program aims to give entrepreneurs the skills, networks, and seed capital to develop scalable business.
Tomato Festival

Don’t Miss List: Our top 5 Atlanta event picks for July

The Coca-Cola Summer Film Festival at the Fox Theatre honors the undead with a 50th-anniversary screening of Night of the Living Dead and jack-of-all-cuisines Ford Fry’s Attack of the Killer Tomato Festival challenges local and visiting chefs, mixologists, and farmers to concoct tomato-based treats at the Westside Provisions District.
Circa Appalachia

Flashback: The Southern photographs that inspired the Food Stamp Act

In the summer of 1967, four doctors and Georgia photographer Al Clayton toured the rural South and Atlanta to document the shacks the country’s poor called home and the meager diets they consumed. Struck by the group’s testimony later that year, Congress would go on to pass the Food Stamp Act.
Robby Ivy

Street Saviors: How Atlanta is helping—not jailing—the homeless, mentally ill, and addicted

Robby Ivy is “care navigator” for Atlanta's Pre-Arrest Diversion Initiative, a program has created an unlikely alliance between police officers and criminal justice activists. Together, they’re trying to answer a key question: Can helping the addicted, mentally ill, and homeless instead of hauling them to jail make Atlanta safer?
Mechanical Riverfront Kingdom

Clark Ashton has a metal-art museum in his Decatur yard: The Mechanical Riverfront Kingdom on Druid Hill

In 1990, Clark Ashton quit his day job as an electronic technician to devote his life to building a metal-art museum in the front and back yards of his Decatur home. The Augusta native dubbed it the Mechanical Riverfront Kingdom on Druid Hill.
Cemetery Music Festival

Don’t Miss List: Our top 5 Atlanta event picks for June

Bill Clinton and James Patterson wrote a new book, and the former president is coming to Cobb Energy Centre to discuss it. Also don't miss Horizon Theatre's production of Freaky Friday, Big Boi at the Tabernacle, and your chance to rock out at Oakland Cemetery.
Metalsome

At a Virginia-Highland dive bar, Metalsome karaoke turns everyone into a headbanger

You don't need to be a professional singer to grab the microphone for hard-rock, live-band karaoke with Metalsome at the 10 High, the small club tucked beneath Dark Horse Tavern. A lot of the 20- and 30-somethings who join in are defiantly tone-deaf and rhythmically deficient (perhaps thanks to a PBR or three).
Atlanta Jazz Festival

Flashback: Laying the groundwork for the Atlanta Jazz Festival, 1966

The list of acts read like a jazz aficionado’s fantasy dinner party: Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, Nina Simone, Buddy Rich, and more. It laid the groundwork for mayor Maynard Jackson to later launch the city’s own—and free—Atlanta Jazz Festival, which has been held annually since 1978 and starts this year on May 26.

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