Civil Rights - Atlanta Magazine
 
 
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Author Betsy Riley

  • Betsy Riley

    Executive Editor

    The editor of Atlanta’s former shelter magazine, Atlanta Magazine’s HOME, she specializes in lifestyle topics such as home and garden, education, healthcare, real estate, travel, and shopping. She also writes occasional narrative features. On the broadcast front, she is a regular contributor to local NPR affiliate WABE’s “Weekend Preview” segments. Before joining the editorial staff ten years ago, Riley was a freelance editor for the magazine for another ten years. During that time, she wrote many features and edited the magazine’s monthly “Atlanta Life” section. She has also written for other regional and national magazines, including O (Oprah’s magazine), Ladies Home Journal, Town & Country, Parenting, and Southern Living. With former Atlanta magazine art director Elaine Hightower, Riley is the author of the award-winning Our Family Meeting Book. She began her career as a medical journalist, eventually becoming publisher of national award-winning newsletters produced by a division of Medical Economics. A graduate of Wake Forest University, she and her husband Mark have lived in Atlanta since 1980. They have two college-age sons.

 

Collier Heights awarded Local Historic District status

The move should preserve the groundbreaking African American neighborhood

At long last, Collier Heights—a West Atlanta neighborhood built by and for African Americans—has been designated as a Local Historic District by the City of Atlanta, the mayor's office announced today. Read More

Hosea Williams

(1926–2000)

Hosea “Hosey” Williams served as a Georgia legislator, Atlanta City Council member, and DeKalb County commissioner, but his extracurricular activities earned him the most notoriety. Read More

Joseph Lowery

(b. 1921)

Lowery, a Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient, is nothing if not outspoken. Read More

Benjamin Mays

(1894-1984)

The eighth child of former South Carolina slaves, Benjamin Mays rose to become the longtime president of Morehouse College, building it into one of the nation’s foremost African American institutions. Read More

Maynard Jackson

(1938-2003)

The child of black Atlanta aristocrats, Jackson was the first grandson of John Wesley Dobbs, the unofficial “Mayor of Auburn Avenue” and a visionary who worked to register black voters. Read More