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Author Rebecca Burns

  • Rebecca Burns

    Deputy Editor & Digital Strategist

    Rebecca Burns is an Atlanta-based journalist, editor, and author.

    She served as editor-in-chief of Atlanta magazine from 2002-2009 and later spent several years as director of digital strategy for Emmis Publishing, working with editors and publishers in company’s family of city and regional magazines—which includes Atlanta, Los Angeles, and Texas Monthly.

    In fall 2012 she returned to Atlanta magazine to serve as deputy editor and digital strategist. She writes and edits feature articles and oversees special projects such as the annual Groundbreakers awards. She launched and manages the Daily Agenda blog and edits the companion section in the print magazine.

    Burns, whose own writing and reporting focus on civil rights and social and economic justice, is the author of three books. The latest, Burial for a King (Scribner, 2011), is account of the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination. Her next book—The Second Burning of Atlanta—will chronicle the Great Fire of 1917.

    Burns teaches journalism at Emory University and the University of Georgia and is a frequent speaker at colleges, schools, and civic organizations.

 

Five decades of civil rights coverage

Selected stories from our archives

Today marks a monumental anniversary: fifty years since the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom and Atlanta native son Martin Luther King Jr.'s iconic "dream" speech. Amid all the discussion of how far we've come and how far we need to go, it's worth reflecting on how King's legacy is reflected in his hometown. Read More

John Lewis’s comic book is a bestseller, and here’s our review

He Read/She Read: A comic book artist and historian on ‘March,’ the civil rights icon’s memoir in graphic novel form

Editor’s Note: Georgia congressman and civil rights legend John Lewis has added another item to his resume: bestselling author. March: Book One, the first volume of his memoir-as-comic trilogy with Marietta-based Top Shelf Productions, grabbed the top spot in its category on the New York Times bestseller list. Lewis, who will deliver the keynote address at the 2013 Decatur Book Festival, is in Washington this week to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom; he notably is the only living speaker from the 1963 event. Read More

Interview: Bernice King

Martin Luther King’s youngest child is taking over the family business. She discusses responsibility, legacy, and growing up under a shadow of tragedy.

When Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968, his youngest child was just five. She had spent little time with her father; he was so often on the road—jailed in Birmingham a few weeks after her birth, addressing 200,000 people on the National Mall when she was five months old, marching from Selma to Montgomery when she was a toddler. Read More

Trayvon Martin rally: 'We must move from stand your ground to common ground'

Thousands gathered in downtown Atlanta to honor Martin and to protest racial profiling

Neither Kathy Sanders nor her son, Rico, had ever attended a political rally before, but they joined thousands of people in downtown Atlanta Saturday afternoon to pay tribute to Trayvon Martin and call for an end to racial profiling. Read More

It’s going to take more than $45 million* to help Vine City

The Falcons stadium deal includes cash for the community. Can Atlanta finally live up to promises made two decades ago?

When it comes to building stuff, Atlanta’s got a great history of public-private partnership. Civic leaders come up with an idea, City Hall irons out the political wrinkles, and then Coke, Delta, the Home Depot, and other hometown companies contribute funding. It’s how Atlanta won the Braves and the Olympics. On the other hand, our track record of taking care of people in the process of building things—large venues in particular—is lousy. Read More