Dining Articles - Atlanta Magazine
 
 

Dining Articles

At Goat Farm, a chef-turned-knifesmith forges blades by hand

David Sturgis uses recycled metal and scraps of wood gathered on the property

Thirty-six-year-old David Sturgis was once the chef at Farm 255 in Athens and later at Muss & Turner’s in Smyrna, but today you can find him in the machine shop at the Goat Farm, forging light carbon steel knives by hand for local chefs. Read more...

Bowling gets fancy at Buckhead's Painted Pin

Hit the lanes with craft cocktails and wood-fired pizzas

Broad appeal is what we’ve come to expect in the last decade and a half from Concentrics Restaurants, the minds behind One Midtown Kitchen, Two Urban Licks, and the Spence, among others. The group’s founder, Bob Amick, has proven that even in a fickle business, he can draw in crowds and keep them coming. But does success run in the family? It would appear so. Read more...

Chamblee's Chinatown Mall captures China's culinary diversity

Fifteen dishes to try at Atlanta's own Little China

If you know the Atlanta Chinatown Mall at all, likely it’s as the shopping center that’s home to dim sum mainstay Oriental Pearl. But the mall’s origins actually date back to 1988, when it opened as a cultural center to serve the area’s growing Chinese American population. Read more...

Atlanta taps into beer's oldest style: Sours

An increase in production in the U.S. and "palate faituge" leads to more tart styles

Sour beer has been around since man first learned to ferment yeast, but it hasn’t always been an easy sell to drinkers who think words like aged and musky belong only in the cheese department. But thanks to recent increases in stateside production and to what some geeks affectionately call “palate fatigue,” beer bars are fielding requests for the tart styles of the olden days—Gose, lambic, Berliner Weisse, Flemish red ale, and gueuze that make up the multilayered sour beer encyclopedia. Read more...

Simplicity is key for these three Ration & Dram cocktails

The Kirkwood watering hole proves complicated ingredients aren't requried for sophisticated drinks

Andy Minchow may be reserved and soft-spoken, but you wouldn’t know it from drinking his assertive cocktails. A former founding partner at Holeman and Finch Public House, Minchow now oversees the cocktail program at his own place, Ration & Dram in Kirkwood. Read more...

Your Guide to the Atlanta Food Truck Scene

Is Atlanta a food truck city? We’re getting there.

Think of food truck cultures, and cities like Portland and Austin and Los Angeles come to mind. Not Atlanta. But six years since people like Greg Smith and Carson Young started pushing legislators, we’re finally seeing some major changes for the better. Read more...

Summer shades of rosé

Take note: Pink is in. Once associated with sickly-sweet blush wine, rosé is now the drink of summer. Refreshing, bright, and energetic, it’s the balmy alternative when red is too heavy and white is too sweet. Read more...

Atlanta's open kitchens turn up the heat

Chefs are breaking down the fourth wall and moving into the dining room

Restaurant kitchens used to be cramped, windowless hellholes invisible to the dining public. Now the cooks have moved into the dining room—literally. Breaking down the fourth wall between chef and customer, these restaurants represent the newest movement in kitchen design. Read more...

Wine lovers rejoice: Coravin device extracts a glassful while still preserving the bottle

Trying a $400 bottle of wine just got a lot more affordable

Wine may look impervious in its thick glass bottles, but it is sensitive stuff. Once it’s uncorked, oxygen will drive even the most elegant quaff toward vinegary ruin. Most restaurants, including those serious about their beverage programs, restrict what they offer by the glass, reserving the pricier, more finessed wines for the bottle list. Read more...

No kitchen, no problem for chef Jarrett Stieber

Meet Atlanta's prince of pop-ups

Most pop-up restaurants—in which a chef typically takes over a professional kitchen for a night or two—serve as incubators or showcases. Traveling toques may want to drum up attention away from home, or cooks who dream of starting their own place might take over a friend’s stoves to grandstand their food. But Jarrett Stieber is the only chef in the city who makes running pop-ups his full-time living. Read more...