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Author Steve Fennessy

  • Steve Fennessy

    Editor

    A native of Auburn, New York, Steve Fennessy's first journalism job was delivering his hometown newspaper. After graduating from American University, he became an intern at that same newspaper, was named business reporter, and then finally city editor. In 1996, he moved to Cairo, Egypt, where he worked as a reporter until 1999, when he became a features writer at the Democrat & Chronicle newspaper in Rochester, New York. The following year, he fled the frigid Northeast for Atlanta to be with his girlfriend, Christy, who is now his wife and the mother of their two boys, Casey and Jack. In Atlanta, Fennessy spent five years at Creative Loafing as news editor and senior writer. He joined Atlanta magazine as articles editor in 2005. Fennessy's stories have won awards from the City and Regional Magazine Association, the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, and the New York State Associated Press Association. His 2006 story for Atlanta magazine "The Talented Dr. Krist" was featured in the 2007 edition of the Best American Crime Writing. In 2006, he was named a Knight-Wallace fellow at the University of Michigan, where he held the Mike Wallace Fellowship for Investigative Reporting during the 2006–07 academic year.

 

Q&A: Writer Charles Bethea talks about his experience interviewing Aubrey Lee Price

I can honestly say that I enjoyed the ten hours I spent mostly listening to him talk, and that I was genuinely moved by much of what he had to say about life, family and (occasionally) financial institutions. The details of his “departure,” as he called it, strained the limits of credulity, but the tears he cried behind bars, when he told me he’d probably never hug his children again, were as real as any I’ve ever seen. Read more

Q&A with author David Beasley

The author of "Without Mercy: The Stunning True Story of Race, Crime, and Corruption in the Deep South" discusses his research, former Governor E.D. Rivers, and the death penalty. Read more

True Bromance

Back in August I had lunch at Miller Union, where co-owner Neal McCarthy had heard that we were trying to get *The Walking Dead* stars to appear on our November cover. Turns out the entire cast had just been at the restaurant a few nights before. Why? Each time another character is killed off, the actors gather to toast their departing comrade and, no doubt, wonder when their own time is up. Read more

Ted Turner

In the forty years he has been in the public eye, Ted Turner has been called a genius, a jackass (by his father, among others), a visionary, childlike (a compliment), childish (not a compliment), a pioneer, a young maverick, an old lion, a straight shooter, egomaniacal, steadfast, restless, haunted, mercurial, brilliant, impatient, impetuous, insecure, generous, genuine, loyal, and cheap. Also nuts. Read more

Q&A with George Turner

George Turner may have the toughest job in the city. As Atlanta’s police chief, he answers to Mayor Kasim Reed, whose mandate to Turner is as simple as it is daunting: Make Atlanta the safest big city in America. Read more

Q&A with Stewart Cink

This month Stewart Cink returns to Augusta National Golf Club to play in his thirteenth Masters. At thirty-six, Cink has matured into one of the most consistent performers on the PGA Tour. Read more

What's the Big Idea?

This month Kasim Reed becomes Atlanta’s first new mayor in eight years. He takes office at one of the most challenging periods in the city’s history. But tough times can spawn great ideas. We canvassed dozens of Atlantans to find the most intriguing. Read more

Max Cleland's Long Road Home

In June, Max Cleland appeared with President Obama in Normandy, France, to commemorate the sixty-fifth anniversary of D-Day. Just days before, Obama had named Cleland secretary of the American Battle Monuments Commission, charged with overseeing the cemeteries and memorials around the world that honor U.S. soldiers who died in battle. Read more

Interview: Arthur Blank

Arthur Blank turned sixty-five last September, in the middle of the worst year of his professional life. Just weeks before, Michael Vick, the marquee Falcons quarterback around whom Blank had built the team, had pleaded guilty to running a dog-fighting ring out of his home in Virginia. Read more

"Sheriff on Deck!"

The sheriff in charge of the jail is a man named Victor Hill, who took office on January 1, 2005. Hill wears a pencil moustache, clock-shaped Gino Franco cufflinks that actually tell time and a badge hanging from a chain around his neck. He stands 5-feet-5. Short men with power and the lust for more are inevitably likened to Napoleon, and in his 18 months as sheriff, Hill hasn’t done much to invalidate the comparison. Read more