2012 Groundbreakers - The Future Issue - Atlanta Magazine
 
 
 
Groundbreakers 2012

Author Michele Cohen Marill

  • Michele Cohen Marill

    Editorial Contributor

    An Atlanta native, she has been writing for Atlanta magazine since 1990. She gained a reputation for taking on in-depth stories and delving into some of Atlanta’s most sensitive issues: tree loss caused by urban sprawl, the crumbling child protection system, the impact of illegal immigration. In 1991, she won a National Headliner Award (second place for “consistently outstanding feature writing in a magazine”). Her article on resegregation of Atlanta’s schools was part of the “Legacy” issue commemorating the death of Martin Luther King Jr., which was a finalist for a 2009 National Magazine Award for single topic issue. She is a graduate of Northwestern University Medill School of Journalism and also has written for Redbook, Good Housekeeping, Parents, PINK, Georgia Trend, and other magazines. She lives in Decatur with her husband and two teenage daughters.

 

Profiles from the August 2012 issue

The Enterprise Innovation Institute

For fostering Atlanta's start-up community

As you read this, programmers hover over laptops and lattes at the Technology Square Starbucks, designing the Next Big Thing. It has never been so easy (or so cheap) to turn a good idea into a global product. So they devise apps to entertain you, devices to save you energy and time, and stuff you won’t know you need until they invent it. Technology Square is the heart of Atlanta’s start-up community and site of the Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC) of Georgia Tech. Stephen Fleming, a former venture capitalist, runs this incubator and the overarching Enterprise Innovation Institute. Read More

GATSBII

For being a provocative alternative in senior healthcare

Meet GATSBII. He’s a sturdy fellow who weighs about 450 pounds and stands at four foot four—unless he needs to reach something and extends to five foot five. He looks just like the classic robot of your imagination: a broad, rolling base that contains two operating computers; arms with clawlike pincers; a laser scanner that hums up and down; and a row of cameras and an Xbox Kinect atop his head. (Yes, we know you shouldn’t use personal pronouns for a robot, but who can resist? Just look at him.) Read More