2012 Groundbreakers - The Future Issue - Atlanta Magazine
 
 
 
Groundbreakers 2012

Author Rebecca Burns

  • Rebecca Burns

    Deputy Editor & Digital Strategist

    Rebecca Burns is an Atlanta-based journalist, editor, and author.

    She served as editor-in-chief of Atlanta magazine from 2002-2009 and later spent several years as director of digital strategy for Emmis Publishing, working with editors and publishers in company’s family of city and regional magazines—which includes Atlanta, Los Angeles, and Texas Monthly.

    In fall 2012 she returned to Atlanta magazine to serve as deputy editor and digital strategist. She writes and edits feature articles and oversees special projects such as the annual Groundbreakers awards. She launched and manages the Daily Agenda blog and edits the companion section in the print magazine.

    Burns, whose own writing and reporting focus on civil rights and social and economic justice, is the author of three books. The latest, Burial for a King (Scribner, 2011), is account of the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination. Her next book—The Second Burning of Atlanta—will chronicle the Great Fire of 1917.

    Burns teaches journalism at Emory University and the University of Georgia and is a frequent speaker at colleges, schools, and civic organizations.

 

Profiles from the August 2012 issue

Ponce City Market

For repurposing the past—2 million square feet of it

On August 2, 1926, Sears threw a party and 30,000 Atlantans showed up, frantic to peek inside the new 750,000-square-foot retail center on Ponce de Leon Avenue, where all of the 35,000 items in the iconic Sears Roebuck catalog were on display. “If ever there was a doubt in the minds of Atlantans that the company actually kept in stock the thousands upon thousands of articles . . . that doubt was erased after a tour through the building,” enthused an Atlanta Constitution reporter. It was built in a record six months by more than 2,000 workers, and Sears pumped $2 million into the construction job market. That’d be $26 million today; no wonder Mayor Walter Sims was on hand to hoist a flag atop the 232-foot tower. Read More