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Author Michele Cohen Marill

  • Michele Cohen Marill

    Editorial Contributor

    An Atlanta native, she has been writing for Atlanta magazine since 1990. She gained a reputation for taking on in-depth stories and delving into some of Atlanta’s most sensitive issues: tree loss caused by urban sprawl, the crumbling child protection system, the impact of illegal immigration. In 1991, she won a National Headliner Award (second place for “consistently outstanding feature writing in a magazine”). Her article on resegregation of Atlanta’s schools was part of the “Legacy” issue commemorating the death of Martin Luther King Jr., which was a finalist for a 2009 National Magazine Award for single topic issue. She is a graduate of Northwestern University Medill School of Journalism and also has written for Redbook, Good Housekeeping, Parents, PINK, Georgia Trend, and other magazines. She lives in Decatur with her husband and two teenage daughters.

 

Smart Medicine

Information to help you make good decisions when it comes to healthcare

In addition to our annual Top Doctors list, we've also gathered tips on how to spend your healthcare dollars wisely—because nobody wants to overpay, even for the best medicine. Read more...

High prices at some Atlanta hospitals: Do they mean anything?

And other questions in a new era of price transparency

Earlier this month, when the federal agency that runs Medicare released a database of hospital prices, it felt as though closely held secrets had been unveiled. But soon, there were just more questions: Who charges the most or the least? Why are some costs so high? And if you have insurance, does it matter? Read more...

What It's Like To: Perform Robot Surgery

Cyril Spann, M.D. Gynecologic oncologist

It’s doing surgery as though you were immersed inside the patient. It’s as if the patient was wide open. You can be a few feet away, but you’re right on top of the pathology and you can see precisely what you’re cutting. Read more...

What It's Like To: Bring Someone Back to Life

David V. Feliciano, M.D. General and endocrine surgeon

In 1993 David V. Feliciano received a phone call in the middle of the night from a surgical resident at Grady Memorial Hospital about a patient who had been stabbed in a robbery. The resident sewed up a hole in the heart, but called Feliciano again when the liver began bleeding uncontrollably. The patient was dying. Read more...

What It's Like To: Deliver a Baby

Elizabeth Street, M.D. Obstetrician

Every patient and [every delivery] is just a little bit different. It does not ever get boring, because it’s never the same. Read more...

What It's Like To: Diagnose a Mysterious Illness

Robin Henry Dretler, M.D. Infectious disease specialist

If things are not going well and you don’t know what to do next, my job is to figure out how we go about figuring out what’s wrong. Is this vasculitis? An autoimmune disease like lupus? Sometimes it’s just a drug allergy. You keep going back to the history, you keep going back to the physical [exam] until you get the clue that leads you to the right diagnosis. Read more...

What It's Like To: Cure a Child with Cancer

Frank Keller, M.D. Pediatric oncologist

Childhood cancer is like a journey that starts when you meet a new family, a new patient. Nobody expects children to have cancer. It’s literally unbelievable. So there’s this big element of shock and fear and grief. These truly are diseases that threaten the life of their beautiful child. Read more...