History - Atlanta Magazine
 
 
Articles on Atlanta History
 

Bittersweet Auburn

The landmark district is named endangered—again

For the second time in twenty years, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has put the Sweet Auburn district—once Atlanta’s center of African American business and culture—on its “endangered” list. Read More

Dedication of the Gold Dome

July 4, 1889

The dedication of Georgia’s new Capitol on July 4, 1889 was an exercise in mixed metaphors. The ceremony, a grand legislative procession from the lawmakers’ temporary digs in an opera house on Marietta Street to the gilded edifice six blocks away, was carefully staged to symbolize democracy as an institution. Read More

Georgian Terrace Centennial

The legendary hotel turns 100

The Georgian Terrace Hotel was completed in 1911 at a cost of $500,000. Early guests included Clark Gable, Carole Lombard, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tallulah Bankhead, Charles Lindbergh, and President Calvin Coolidge. Read More

Six Flags Over Georgia opens

June 16, 1967

It took $12 million to transform a 276-acre dairy farm west of Downtown into the Southeast’s first theme park; that Magic Kingdom down in Orlando wouldn’t open for four years. But all the clearing and construction didn’t eradicate the red clay and scrubby pines of the Cobb County surroundings when Six Flags Over Georgia opened for business on June 16, 1967. That rustic flavor added to the verisimilitude of Six Flags Over Georgia’s prime attractions: the Dahlonega Mine Train roller coaster, which hurtled from a thirty-seven-foot peak, and the Tales of the Okefenokee boat ride, which took passengers past slightly creepy scenes based on Joel Chandler Harris fables. Read More

Mall of Fame

Lenox Square turns 50

When Lenox Square opened in August 1959, it was not just the first mall in Atlanta but the first in the entire region. Read More

"I Have a Dream..."

If the road to Equal Opportunity is paved with the good intentions of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center For Social Change to address the experience of all people, then the implementation of their planning must surely focus on the poor and oppressed. Isn’t that what the dream was all about?

If the road to Equal Opportunity is paved with the good intentions of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center For Social Change to address the experience of all people, then the implementation of their planning must surely focus on the poor and oppressed. Isn’t that what the dream was all about? Read More