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Lisa Mowry

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Love Me Do: A Beatles-inspired home office

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John Byrne's Beatles-inspired office

An affinity for the Beatles was the starting point for John Byrne’s office, where the retired Coca-Cola exec now relaxes among his beloved British icons. Cartersville-based interior designer Beverly Baribault deftly channeled Carnaby Street—circa 1968—throughout the space.

1. Come together
Knowing pattern would continue the cheeky feeling of the room, the designer turned to another British brand, Cole & Son, for geometric wallpaper.

2. Valancing act
Beverly’s custom window treatments used tapestries of the Fab Four trimmed with a green velvet, continued in the draperies. “My goal was to select a green that blends with the Beatles’ image but didn’t overpower them as the focal point,” she says.

3. In my light
A modern, masculine chandelier from the aptly named furniture company Noir anchors the room.

4. Savvy sculpture
John and his wife, Michelle, purchased the cubist wall sculpture in Asheville. Its 3-D charm enhances the room’s groovy vibe.

5. Get back
Clean-lined furnishings—some from perennial favorite, West Elm—are in keeping with the throwback look.

Tip
Baribault splurged on the officially licensed Beatles fabric by Andrew Martin, but she used it in a clever way that didn’t involve a lot of yardage. Similarly, using small amounts of fabric for pillows or chair backs is budget-wise.

This article appears in our April 2019 issue.

With a timeless design, this craftsman-style house in Howell Station is filled with surprises

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Westside craftsman
“I loved pink before pink was cool,” says homeowner Heidi Woessner, a neurologist at Piedmont Hospital, who wanted a feminine home office. Interior designer Kate Hayes ordered the custom Moroccan-style doors from a company called Pinecrest, then had them painted with a lacquered finish. The walls are wrapped in a Zoffany pattern that resembles agate. The brass desk is from CB2.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

When Heidi Woessner and her husband, Jason Williams, bought the Westside lot, it was just a sloping plot of weeds with a cinderblock house. But the Howell Station neighborhood, sandwiched between the West Midtown shops and restaurants and the future Westside Park at Bellwood Quarry (which will become the city’s largest park), has become a hot intown haven. The couple was able to buy the land slated for two smaller houses so they could build one custom home with a yard for their three dogs.

Westside craftsman

Westside craftsman
A Jonathan Adler chandelier brings the right amount of glam to the breakfast room.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Westside craftsman
The living room mixes midcentury and contemporary elements with its understated custom mantel, a coffered ceiling, pillow fabrics by Miles Redd for Schumacher, and a travertine coffee table from Williams Sonoma Home. The art over the mantel is trompe l’oeil; it’s a Samsung television with changeable screensavers and a walnut frame.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

All along, they wanted something that looked historic, where nobody could quite tell what year it had been built, says Jason. The Craftsman exterior is a nod to timeless design, and inside, they continued the classic look with 10-foot ceilings, substantial trim work, a Dutch door, and old-fashioned joinery techniques. Working off a plan by architect Bonnie Henry, the couple enlisted interior designer Kate Hayes to assist with every step.

Westside craftsman
Kate chose Benjamin Moore “Webster Green” for the cabinetry and a pale blue backsplash —Ogee Drop from Fireclay Tile—for optimum effect. The custom hood and barstools are by Hancock Surface Studio and Kendrick Anderson; the appliances are Sub-Zero and Wolf.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Westside craftsman
The kitchen’s green hues are carried into a festive bar area off the foyer. Brass hardware is by Schoolhouse.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

“I had a pretty good Pinterest page to start with,” admits Heidi, “but I didn’t want a house that looked like anyone else’s. I wanted to be prodded.” Kate did just that, coaxing Heidi into a dreamy kitchen bathed in shades of saturated green, with a backsplash of handmade Moroccan-style tile. A groovy agate wallpaper and custom pink doors to Heidi’s office are other unique touches. “We definitely went a little edgy,” says Kate, confirming that this house is all about taking risks.

Westside craftsman
The master bath feels current, but elements like a clawfoot tub and basketweave tile floors look at home in a historic neighborhood.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Westside craftsman
A Restoration Hardware poster bed fills the vaulted master bedroom. Tables are from Serena & Lily and rug is West Elm.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Resources
Interior design Kate Hayes, katehayesdesign.com
Architect Bonnie Henry, design-bh.com
Builder Georgia Residential Group, thisisgrg.wordpress.com
Office Wallpaper: Zoffany, Grizell & Mann, grizzelandmann.com. Desk and chandelier: CB2, cb2.com. Pillows: Slightly East, slightlyeast.com. Chair: Restoration Hardware, 3030 Peachtree Road, restorationhardware.com. Doors: Pinecrest, pinecrestinc.com. Paint on doors: Benjamin Moore “Rosetta,” benjaminmoore.com.
Foyer Rug: Etsy, etsy.com.
Guest bedroom Daybed: CB2.
Kitchen Cabinet hardware: Schoolhouse, schoolhouse.com. Cabinet color: Benjamin Moore “Webster Green.” Pendants: Rejuvenation, Ponce City Market, rejuvenation.com. Backsplash tile: Fireclay Tile, fireclaytile.com. Custom hood and barstools: Ryan Hancock, stools in collaboration with Kendrick Anderson, hancocksurfacestudio.com. Appliances: Sub-Zero and Wolf, 3280 Peachtree Road, subzero-wolf.com.
Living room Sofa: Room & Board, Westside Provisions District, roomandboard.com. Black wicker chair: Pottery Barn, multiple locations, potterybarn.com. Coffee table: Williams Sonoma, multiple locations, williams-sonoma.com. Floor lamp: Circa Lighting, Aerin collection, 3078 Roswell Road, circalighting.com. Pillow fabrics: Miles Redd for Schumacher, ADAC, fschumacher.com.
Master bedroom Bed: Restoration Hardware. End tables and dresser: Serena & Lily, Westside Provisions District, serenaandlily.com. Lamps: Arteriors, arteriorshome.com. Rug: West Elm, multiple locations, westelm.com.

This article appears in our Spring 2019 issue of Atlanta Magazine’s HOME.

An interior designer freshens up this Augusta Italian Renaissance–style estate in time for the Masters

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Augusta estate
Built in 1926 in a historic Augusta neighborhood, the brick Italian Renaissance–style house had only three owners before Morgan and Justin Bundy bought it.

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

In Augusta, all things somehow relate back to the Masters Tournament, and this grand house owes some credit to the golf event for its recent update. Thousands of people descend on the city every April, and many residents rent out their houses, explains homeowner Morgan Bundy. When she and her husband, Justin, were looking for a house to buy last year, they loved this 1920s Italian Renaissance estate for many reasons—its barrel-tiled roof, original details, and its potential as a stunning Masters rental.

“When you first walk in the front door, you can see from one end to the other, which is so appealing,” says Morgan, who grew up in Augusta and knew the significance of the historic area dubbed “the Hill.” Morgan works in medical sales, but has always helped her mother’s business renting homes and facilitating activities during Masters week, so she had an incentive to update the house pronto for the tournament last year. Fortunately, Brittany Cason Johnston, an Augusta interior designer who had been looking for a large house to use as a showhouse fundraiser, stepped in.

Augusta estate
Justin Bundy grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and the Spanish Mediterranean–influenced red tile roof appealed to him. “Justin’s previous house had been 100 percent bachelor pad, so we were starting from scratch,” says his wife Morgan, an Augusta native.

Photograph by Kelly Blackmon

Augusta estate
Designer Brittany Cason Johnston gave the living room Hollywood glamour—but with some modern mojo. “I wanted to conjure up the kind of room where Frank Sinatra is playing and people are sipping martinis,” she says. A geometric coffee table and traditional club chairs are accented with tortoise-shell lamps and a chinoiserie-inspired watercolor by artist Kat McCall.

Photograph by Emily Followill

“It was perfect timing,” says Brittany. “We wanted to create a not-so-typical showhouse, and it allowed Morgan to avoid having to quickly make a lot of decisions herself.” Fortunately, the grand old manse—designed by architect Willis Irvin, who worked on the original Augusta National clubhouse—had been well maintained.

Augusta estate
The new kitchen merges modern and traditional sensibilities. Classic shaker-style cabinets are jazzed up with mirrored honeycomb-shaped inserts on upper cabinetry. A curvilinear chandelier softens the square edges. “The chartreuse bar stools give a ‘wow’ to the room, and tie in to the dining room colors,” says Brittany. Acrylic stools have sloping arms to fit underneath the counters.

Photograph by Emily Followill

Augusta estate
Augusta designer Julie Taylor livened up a traditional dining room with chartreuse window treatments and a Visual Comfort chandelier that references the past. To emphasize a sense of history in the grand room, she incorporated antique vases and a portrait of the Duke of Wellington.

Photograph by Emily Followill

Augusta estate

“We were able to leave the original molding, mantels, and doors and windows, and mostly just update the aesthetics,” recalls the designer. The kitchen got a full overhaul with new cabinetry and appliances, but retained its original square footage. A host of local designers tackled the interiors and outdoor living areas, injecting a cohesive array of color and whimsy. After a quick few months of decorating, the designer showhouse opened last March benefiting SafeHomes of Augusta, a domestic violence center.

Augusta estate
Iwanted this bedroom to feel like a boutique hotel, something sort of different,” says Morgan. Brittany paired the bold brown-and-white patterned fabric by Romo with a tinted blush ceiling and velvet pillows.

Photograph by Emily Followill

Augusta estate
This corner of the living room features several conversation-starting elements: the curvy velvet chair by Global Views, blue chinoiserie vases from the 1930s, and a table with gold deer legs.

Photograph by Emily Followill

The Bundys kept most of the furnishings, but they didn’t move in right away; instead, they opened the doors to a group of Spanish bankers for Masters week. After that, they took residence and began their own yearly traditions. “We turned this into a beautiful showhouse, but we also did everything to make sure this would be the Bundys’ ‘forever home,’” says Brittany.

Resources
Lead interior designer Brittany Cason Johnston, brittanycasonintdesign.com
Landscape architect Matthew W. Raulerson, 770-530-0990.
Landscaping Greg Poteet, Georgia Outdoor Service, 706-863-2114.
Living room Sofa: CR Laine, crlaine.com. Watercolor over sofa: Kat McCall, kmccall.com. Velvet chair: Global Views, AmericasMart, globalviews.com.
Kitchen Cabinetry: B & B Woodworks, 706-796-2003. Window treatment fabric: Donghia, ADAC, donghia.com. Appliances: Miele, mieleusa.com.
Guest bedroom Window treatment and bed fabric: Romo, ADAC, romo.com.

This article appears in our Spring 2019 issue of Atlanta Magazine’s HOME.

Room Envy: Transforming this Poncey-Highland attic space into a master bath awash in light

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Room envy

Making the most of a 1920s Poncey-Highland house, architect Roger DeWeese tapped into unused attic space to create a spacious master bath. “We exposed existing dormers and recycled salvaged windows to maximize light and headroom,” he says. “Since the upstairs windows look directly into a tree canopy, we made it a modern ‘treehouse’ experience.”

Wood works
Attic spaces often have exposed wood, so DeWeese played off that look with wood planking on the walls and ceiling.

Disappearing act
A floating vanity (“Kole” by Porcelanosa) and frameless shower door add an ethereal quality. The architect intentionally chose LED lights and forewent an overhead fixture for simplicity.

Subtle accent
A wall of white glazed mosaic tiles (“Shogun” by Soli) adds texture while suiting the clean-lined look.

Natural vibe
Flooring in a weathered-gray hue has the warm look homeowner Tom Jung prefers, but the planks are actually porcelain tiles by Ann Sacks that withstand moisture.

Nice nook
Custom cubbies between the sink and shower can hold towels and other bath items. A mirrored medicine cabinet keeps the vanity clutter-free with its hidden space for toiletries.

Tip
DeWeese used a perennial favorite—Benjamin Moore “White Dove”—on walls and ceiling. “White is popular in bathrooms because it gives a clean and bright impression,” he says, “but you need to add some wood tones for contrast.”

This article appears in our March 2019 issue.

Designed by Neel Reid, this circa-1914 Druid Hills abode is a vibrant family home

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Neel Reid Druid Hills home

This stately Georgian-style house with the red door often attracts the eye of architecture fans—even if they don’t realize it was designed by historic architect Neel Reid. But the house also gets high praise from homeowner Donna Heilman for livability. She and her husband, Johnny, were somewhat familiar with Reid’s classic exteriors but appreciate his talents even more on the inside. “You can walk in and tell it’s his design by things like the high ceilings and molding, but the house is truly grand and functional both,” Donna says. “We love and use every room.”

Neel Reid Druid Hills home
The Heilman family includes Donna, Patterson (11), Jessie (9), and Johnny. Throughout the house, framed blueprints and renderings depict the house’s original design.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Neel Reid Druid Hills home
A lacquered pink table from Connecticut-based Dunes and Duchess is home base for the sunroom. (Interior designers Lathem Gordon and Cate Dunning call it the “ladies’ lounge.”) The striking beaded chandelier from Ro Sham Beaux feels both modern and nostalgic.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Neel Reid Druid Hills home
An antique rug anchors the living room, rich with original millwork. Jim Thompson fabrics, a painting by Decatur artist Crysta Luke, and a whimsical lamp from Bunny Williams add vivid pattern to the room.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

They were drawn to the circa-1914 Druid Hills home for the same reasons other people appreciate the neighborhood: curving streets and diverse horticulture in six linear parks (designed by another revered name: Frederick Law Olmsted), deep wooded lots, and large, European-style homes. The Heilmans didn’t want the house to be a stuffy shrine to the past, however. On any given day, the kids might be taking ukulele lessons in the living room, splashing in the pool, or playing games on the sun porch, so interior design needed to be friendly and fresh.

Neel Reid Druid Hills home
Bamboo chairs found at Ballard Designs Backroom wear a new coat of “Poolside” by Benjamin Moore to liven the dining room. An antique dining table is softened with a custom tablecloth made with Robert Allen fabric. “Each room had to have equal scoops of vanilla and sprinkles to keep it balanced,” says Cate.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Neel Reid Druid Hills home
A Gabby chaise with Beacon Hill mohair and a chic floor lamp from Robert Abbey set the tone for a cozy reading area in the master. Two local artists contributed to the vignette: The large-scale painting is by Lucy Reiser, and the Roman shades are by fabric designer Kari Fisher.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

The Heilmans enlisted Lathem Gordon and Cate Dunning, the interior design duo behind Gordon Dunning, who gutted the kitchen and bathrooms but kept most of the traditional layout intact. They selected mostly traditional furniture to honor the surroundings but weren’t afraid to take risks. “We used color to shake things up,” says Lathem. “When we originally did a walk-through with the Heilmans, Donna said, ‘I know the eye is supposed to have a place to rest, but not in my house.’”

Neel Reid Druid Hills home
A family chest Donna has used since college has sentimental value and serves as storage in the master bathroom, which was once a sleeping porch. She jokes: “The master bath became the gallery for things I like that other people don’t like as much.” The pilaster is original to the house.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Neel Reid Druid Hills home
“Lighting was a fun punctuation mark in some of the simpler spaces,” says Lathem. The geometric light fixture is from Taylor Burke Home. A custom-made table of wood and marble adds gravitas to the lively shades of teal, lavender, and mint around it.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Neel Reid Druid Hills home
Bedding in the master bedroom features an Asian-inspired fabric by Schumacher. Bedside tables are by Gabby.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Zebra wallpaper, stately chairs upholstered in chinoiserie fabric, and pops of teal and turquoise fill the house, exemplifying this bold direction. “This whole project was all about striking the balance between fun and sophisticated,” says Cate. “The most serious of antiques needed to have the brightest and freshest abstracts nearby and vice versa.”

Donna and Johnny took the leap to merge fine architecture with fresh decor, but they give credit to their famous architect and the fun-loving but serious designers for the rest. Says Donna: “It takes professional people to tell your story.”

Neel Reid Druid Hills home
The designers eliminated a large walk-in pantry to expand the kitchen and add a butler’s pantry, bar, and windows. Brass-toned pendants from Global Views warm up the white cabinets with help from custom Roman shades and turquoise counter stools.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Neel Reid Druid Hills home
The lagoon-shaped pool is a big hit with the family, enjoyed year-round for swimming or as a focal point from the first-floor windows. The Heilmans keep it uncovered throughout the year and are known to do an occasional “polar bear challenge” in wintertime.

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

Resources
Interior design
 Lathem Gordon and Cate Dunning, GordonDunning, gordondunning.com
Landscaping tiltingwindmill.com
Sunroom Table: Dunes and Duchess, dunesandduchess.com. Chairs: Lee Industries, Upcountry Home, ADAC, upcountryhome.com. Sofa: Bernhardt, bernhardt.com, upholstered in Duralee fabric, ADAC, duralee.com. Chandelier: Ro Sham Beaux, ro-sham-beaux.com.
Living room Wing chairs: Lee Industries, leeindustries.com, upholstered in Jim Thompson fabric, ADAC, jimthompsonfabrics.com. Coffee table: Oly Studio, olystudio.com. Sofa: Bernhardt, upholstered in Romo fabric, ADAC, romo.com. Draperies: Brunschwig & Fils, ADAC, kravet.com and Drape98, drape98.com. Table lamps: Bunny Williams, Lee Jofa, ADAC, kravet.com. Painting over mantel: Crysta Luke, crystaluke.com.
Dining room Chairs: Ballard Designs, 1235 Chattahoochee Avenue, ballarddesigns.com, in Benjamin Moore “Poolside,” benjaminmoore.com. Dining tablecloth: Robert Allen, robertallen.com, made by Home Accent Inc., homeaccentinteriors.com
Foyer Wallpaper: Thibaut, thibautdesign.com.
Kitchen Counter stools: Bernhardt, upholstered in Schumacher, ADAC, fschumacher.com. Roman shades fabric: Brunschwig & Fils. Pendants: Global Views, globalviews.com.
Breakfast room Chairs: Made Goods, ADAC, madegoods.com. Light fixture: Taylor Burke Home, taylorburkehome.com. Pillow fabrics: Brunschwig & Fils.
Master bedroom Bed: Redford House, redfordhouse.com. Bedding: Schumacher. Throw pillow: Lulu DK, luludk.com. Chaise: Gabby, gabbyhome.com, upholstered in Beacon Hill fabric, beaconhill.com. Art: Lucy Reiser through Anne Irwin Fine Art, 690 Miami Circle, anneirwinfineart.com. Lamp: Robert Abbey, robertabbeylightingstore.com. Roman shades: Kari Fisher Designs, karifisherdesigns.com.

This article appears in our Spring 2019 issue of Atlanta Magazine’s HOME.

An Atlanta family crafts a rundown ranger station in Highlands into a creative, cozy cottage

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Mountain Makeover
Homeowners Laird Memory and Matt Bunting made this spacious porch a centerpiece of the remodel. A medley of furniture, both vintage and new, got a coat of mustard paint for continuity.

Photograph by Jeff Herr

Highlands, North Carolina, is well-known among Atlantans for its rustic mountain houses, but it was a modest office building that caught Laird Memory’s eye as a potential second home. “It had been for sale a long time and was in a great spot close to town,” she says of the low-slung former ranger station and law office. “But the interiors were super ugly.” The fake wood paneling and brown carpet, however, didn’t deter Laird and her husband, Matt Bunting, from transforming the building into their dream mountain getaway.

Mountain Makeover
“I’m obsessed with chalet railings,” says Laird, who designed the wooden staircase banister with rounded cutouts, constructed by her contractor, Mason Neil of Highlands-based MountainKraft Builders. She crafted the quilted flag out of wool blankets.

Photograph by Jeff Herr

Mountain Makeover
An Ikea kitchen featuring birch Shaker-style cabinets got an easy upgrade, custom painted in Benjamin Moore “Victorian Garden.” Brass fixtures and accessories add warmth to the clean subway tile.

Photograph by Jeff Herr

Mountain Makeover
Sofas and chairs feature midcentury lines, but Laird adds inviting layers with rugs found on eBay and pillows she made herself. A trio of modern globe lights accentuates the 15-foot-high ceilings.

Photograph by Jeff Herr

Once the couple met with Atlanta architect David Colgan, they all decided to add a second floor and create an “upside-down house,” placing main rooms like the living room and kitchen on the higher level with bedrooms tucked down below. It creates an ideal scenario for entertaining, giving the home’s social spaces the best views. The living area features large windows, a vaulted ceiling, and a spacious porch overlooking peaceful Harris Lake.

Mountain Makeover
As economical art that pays tribute to nature, vintage Audubon prints were enlarged and framed in the dining area.

Photograph by Jeff Herr

Mountain Makeover
Laird enlarged and framed vintage postcards of the area, adding to the throwback charm.

Photograph by Jeff Herr

Inside, the vibe is both relaxed and vibrant. “I’ve always loved the balance of modern and traditional,” says Laird, who designed the interiors. After years at Turner Broadcasting, she now channels her creativity into art and decorating projects and filled the house with a creative mix of vintage, thrift-store, and modern wares—the latter exemplified by large-scale, domed light fixtures hanging from the 15-foot ceilings. Her favorite color pops up everywhere. “I love red,” she says. “It just makes me happy. To me, it’s a neutral.” She paid homage to Highlands with vintage postcards, enlarged and framed on the walls.

Mountain Makeover
Laird framed cheeky bird prints by artist Charlie Harper in the master bedroom and paired them with vintage side chests. The wooden bed is from Target but has qualities—and the look—of a more expensive panel bed, says Laird.

Photograph by Jeff Herr

Mountain Makeover
A guest bedroom features a navy-and-white color scheme and industrial-style headboards. Kantha quilts bring in lively pattern.

Photograph by Jeff Herr

Mountain Makeover
The master bath is warmed up by travertine tiles and a tree-stump table. Black doors and window mullions appear throughout the house.

Photograph by Jeff Herr

The family, which includes Raleigh (11) and Augie (12), calls Buckhead home but enjoys spending time off wandering the trails and exploring the quaint town. “I hear a lot of people say they want to move to the mountains or a small town, but in Highlands, you have both,” Matt says. “Sometimes it feels like we see our Atlanta friends more in Highlands than in Atlanta.”

Mountain Makeover

Mountain Makeover
The plain facade of the former ranger station (below right) now epitomizes cottage chic, with its dark paint and bright red door. Choosing a commercial building for a remodel has advantages, notes Matt. “It was built by the parks department decades ago,” he says, “so it was built to last a long time.”

Photograph by Jeff Herr

Resources
Architect David Colgan, Merrill, Pastor, & Colgan Architects, merrillpastor.com
Living room Light fixtures: Restoration Hardware, restorationhardware.com. Sofa: Article, article.com. Chairs: Ikea, ikea.com.
Kitchen Cabinetry: Ikea
Master bedroom Bed: Target, target.com

This article appears in our Winter 2018 issue of Atlanta Magazine’s HOME.

Room Envy: This cozy kitchen moves the refrigerator and small appliances out of view

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Room envy

Bravo to kitchens that function well—without a predictable recipe of ingredients. For a clean look, builder and designer Pam Sessions located the refrigerator and small appliances in an adjacent pantry and forewent the ubiquitous barstools for a luxurious banquette.

Time to shine
The cozy kitchen setup led to one knockout chandelier rather than typical pendants. This beaded number from Currey & Company makes a stately focal point.

Hoodwinked
Reversing the trend of vent hoods that scream, “Look at me,” this wooden one is understated but clever, with niches on either side.

Cool hues
Sessions chose white-oak floors in a nontoxic stain called “Salty Biscuit.” A touch of blue adds interest to gray cabinetry.

Fine dining
Instead of using the countertop as a breakfast bar, Sessions designed this banquette. Faux leather from Designs by Sudi scores high for comfort and durability.

Old ideas
An antique table brings a warm patina to the seating area, and vintage chairs with a midcentury vibe were recovered in a lively Zak + Fox fabric to keep the look fresh.

Tip
Marry style and function with mounted pot racks. “I think hanging pots and pans sends the message that this is a working kitchen but still looks great,” says Sessions, who rents out this home through her boutique rental company, Hedgewood Stay.

This article appears in our February 2019 issue.

This Cumming house is chic, sophisticated, and family-friendly

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Taylor house
A brick, Mediterranean-inspired facade includes a spacious front porch. The Taylors’ house, built in 2016 in Cumming’s Vickery neighborhood, overlooks a greenspace for all neighbors to enjoy.

Photography by Mali Azima

Design plans can be stalled by indecision, but that wasn’t an issue for Jessica and Trip Taylor. “Jessica knew what she wanted and didn’t get paralyzed in the decision-making,” says interior designer Stephanie Williamson. “I would suggest something to her and Trip, and they’d get back to me the next day.” Because the house was new construction and almost everything in it was custom, this project involved more selections than most.

Taylor house
Homeowners Jessica and Trip Taylor with twins Piper and Dru

Photography by Mali Azima

Taylor house

Where to live was an easy choice. The Taylors were drawn to Vickery, a Hedgewood Homes neighborhood developed by Pam Sessions and Don Donnelly, after driving up to the planned community in Cumming one night for dinner. “It’s one of those neighborhoods where people still let kids run free,” says Jessica, who’d noticed children playing in the greenspaces and walking to a neighborhood store. “It’s like a step back in time.”

Hedgewood Homes and architect Lew Oliver worked with the family to create a design that accommodated their ideas.

Taylor house
Richly colored cabinetry (painted “Dark Knight” by Sherwin-Williams) is warmed up by brass accents, including the custom hood-banding and hardware designed by Hedgewood Homes.

Photography by Mali Azima

Taylor house
A crisp blue-and-white color scheme in the breakfast room is carried from the custom banquette and geometric pillows to a handmade table with a whitewashed wood top by local artisan Kevin Scanlon. Pecky cypress on the storage wall suits the light palette.

Photography by Mali Azima

Taylor house
Twin dining tables address the length of the room, surrounded by a mix of settees and chairs of varying heights. Sumptuous velvet on window treatments and chairs adds drama to the clean-lined dining room.

Photography by Mali Azima

Parents of five-year-old twins, Jessica and Trip wanted a home with a casual sophistication but not something everyone else had. “I feel like so many other houses look like they came from a catalog,” says Jessica. Enter Stephanie, who took that popular look—a lighter color palette, comfy swivel chairs and sofas—and refined it with custom furniture in luxurious fabrics and colors. Wood artisan Kevin Scanlon created tables out of white oak with custom paint stains in the dining room, living room, breakfast room, and other areas. Atlanta’s own Bradley USA was the source for chic, one-of-a-kind consoles and mirrors. The final product is subdued but with intriguing textures: linens, velvets, pecky cypress, and mohair.

Taylor house
Builder Pam Sessions with Hedgewood Homes is known for sophisticated landscaping. Silver travertine pavers and artificial turf form an attractive grid pattern. “It almost feels like being in a European village,” Pam says.

Photography by Mali Azima

Taylor house
Antique chemistry beakers used as flower vases and a petrified wood side table from B.D. Jeffries contribute a bit of history to the new master bath.

Photography by Mali Azima

Taylor house
An upholstered wall, velvet bed, and cantilevered bedside tables bring a Hollywood vibe to the master bedroom, while a subtly patterned wool rug by Emily Dunn Designs delivers softness. Large light fixtures by Circa Lighting help fill the space—and look pretty from the outside looking in.

Photography by Mali Azima

Jessica wanted rooms to function for all ages, so she often opted for performance fabrics or indoor-outdoor rugs, two tried-and-true solutions to spills and dirty shoes. The comfy-casual dining room is a destination for the whole family. “The kids love eating in the dining room,” she says. “So, as a tradition, we all sit in there for Sunday night suppers.”

Resources
Builder Hafner Construction Inc., through Hedgewood Homes, hedgewoodhomes.com
Architect Lew Oliver, wholetownsolutions.com
Interior design Stephanie Williamson, S M Geyer Interior Design, 404-934-3334, smginteriordesign.com
Front porch Furniture: Janus et Cie, janusetcie.com
Foyer Console, mirror, and light fixture: Bradley USA, bradley-usa.com
Living room Linen chairs: Lee Industries, leeindustries.com. Coffee table: Kevin Scanlon, 312-287-9828. Light fixture: Circa Lighting, circalighting.com. Photography over fireplace: Pryor Fine Art, pryorfineart.com. Onyx side table: Pieces, piecesinc.com.
Kitchen Lighting: Circa Lighting. Barstools and bar bench: Lee Industries.
Breakfast room Banquette fabric: Donghia, donghia.com. Banquette fabrication: James Parks, 404-236-7600. Pillow fabric: Larsen, cowtan.com/larsen. Custom table: Kevin Scanlon. Light fixture: Circa Lighting.
Dining room Custom tables: Kevin Scanlon. Settees and armchairs: Lee Industries. Window treatment fabrication: Frank and Kay Wyatt with 3W Quilting, 770-664-4024
Master bedroom Custom bed: R. Hopkins, 404-351-6441. Bedding: Traditions Linens, traditionslinens.com. Upholstered wall: James Parks, Divine Drapery, 404-236-7600. Custom bedside tables: Skylar Morgan Furniture, skylarmorganfurniture.com. Bedside table hardware: Matthew Quinn Collection, matthewquinncollection.com. Armless sofa: Bungalow Classic, bungalowclassic.com. Floating mirror: Myott Studio, myottstudio.com.
Pool Furniture: Restoration Hardware, restorationhardware.com

This article appears in our Winter 2018 issue of Atlanta Magazine’s HOME.

How a pair of designers added drama to this Southern suburban home

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David Frazier house
Classical busts and sculptures are a nod to homeowner Mike’s childhood partially spent in Greece.

Photograph by Sarah Dorio

David Frazier house
New York–based designer David Frazier gave his parents’ house a dramatic refresh—just in time to host his 10-year high school reunion.

Photograph courtesy of David Frazier

For Georgia-based Buffy Ferguson and New York–based David Frazier, two designers were better than one when it came to freshening up David’s family home. His parents, Patsy and Mike Frazier, purchased the house in 2005 but began to grow tired of the ’90s-era, cookie-cutter decorating. David, who graduated from Auburn University with a degree in architecture, had since moved to Manhattan and launched his own design firm, so he called in Buffy to collaborate and execute the job. Her office in West Point, Georgia, is just across the state line from the Fraziers’ home in Lanett, Alabama.

But Buffy, a family friend, was more than the local liaison. She helped bridge design styles between a 20-something and his parents and take the pressure off mixing work and family. “Buffy played ‘middle man’ between Mom, Dad, and me,” David says. “She also has a much more feminine sensibility and could soften my modern aesthetic.” The design team was taking their time until David agreed to host his 10-year high school reunion and a friend’s engagement party there. “There’s nothing like a hard deadline to create some urgency to finish,” he says.

David Frazier house
“I wanted this to feel like a private dining room in any great New York City restaurant, but the kind of space you can use as a game room, a work space—and it’s been used for all that,” says David. “There’s no reason for a dining room to feel like a banquet hall used once a year.” Moody “Toucan Black” by Benjamin Moore coats the walls; David’s friends at Blackshop created the custom black steel console.

Photograph by Sarah Dorio

Design lessons to copy:

The “wow” doesn’t have to come from architecture.
“This is a pretty typical suburban house,” says Buffy. “But you don’t have to have a house with great features to make it dramatic.” Dark walls and light furniture—with one eye-catching painting in each room—provide the sophisticated dynamic in both the dining and living rooms.

David Frazier house
A hornet’s nest found at the family’s second home on Lake Martin serves as a favorite piece of art in the keeping room. An adjustable floor lamp by Visual Comfort illuminates reading chairs by Noir.

Photograph by Sarah Dorio

David Frazier house
“The chairs in the breakfast room are a Scott Antique Markets find—the set was $300,” says David. “I love them because it reminds me that good design doesn’t have to be expensive.”

Photograph by Sarah Dorio

Art collections can provide unity.
Paintings by Signe and Genna Grushovenko, collected over the years, are in almost every room. “My parents and I joke that we’re their largest gallery,” says David. Buffy points out the appeal of the colorful, layered pieces, with references to vintage photographs: “It’s approachable art, and each one evokes memories, as if you could imagine someone you know in each painting,” she says.

David Frazier house
Lighter, upholstered furniture is from Bungalow Classic on Atlanta’s Westside. To mask an asymmetrical grouping of windows and doors, David covered them with bamboo shades and new draperies.

Photograph by Sarah Dorio

David Frazier house
A vignette with dark walls, a mounted ram’s head, and sculpted topiaries epitomizes David’s love of contrast.

Photograph by Sarah Dorio

Balance is everything.
Furniture with history and the patina of old wood is important, so antiques in each room are as key as comfortable seating. Compromises were part of the process, too. David lobbied for a more modern light fixture in the dining room, but Buffy steered the choice to a brass chandelier with an overscaled edge—more appealing to the parents but still a look everyone could get behind.

Resources
Interior design David Frazier, davidfrazier.co. Buffy Ferguson, Elizabeth Ferguson Design, 706-773-3295, elizabethfergusondesign.com
Paintings grushovenko.com
Dining Room Table: Noir, noirfurniturela.com. Chairs: Restoration Hardware, restorationhardware.com. Console: Blackshop, blackshopbham.com.
Foyer Chest: Scott Antique Markets, scottantiquemarket.com. Bench: Noir.
Living room Sofa and chairs: Bungalow Classic, bungalowclassic.com. Drapery fabric: Schumacher, fschumacher.com.
Keeping room Antique French Empire chest: Willow Creek Gallery, Knoxville, Tennessee. Chairs: Noir. Light fixture: Circa Lighting, circalighting.com

This article appears in our Winter 2018 issue of Atlanta Magazine’s HOME.

Forget Los Angeles—Alexandra Breckenridge and Casey Hooper made Georgia their home and never looked back

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Breckenridge

If any couple needs a place to nest, it’s Alexandra Breckenridge and her husband, Casey Hooper. They married in 2015, had baby Jack in 2016, and then daughter Billie came along in 2017. “We do things quickly,” says Alexandra, smiling. Along the way, she was cast as the nurse/soulmate/ex-wife of Kevin Pearson on NBC’s hit show This is Us. The role cemented her career, already hopping with gigs on American Horror Story and The Walking Dead, which brought her to Atlanta. Casey, whom she met at a Grammys after-party while both were living in California, was wrapping up years of touring the world as lead guitarist for Katy Perry.

Breckenridge
Wallpaper also livens up their breakfast nook. “I’m pretty sure the first time I saw it, I thought it was sea creatures,” says Alexandra. “Then I realized it was floating fruit, but I loved that it was super fun and also light.” She found it in the store Walnut in L.A.

Photograph by Anthony Masterson

Breckenridge
Upgrades to the kitchen lightened this room, including a new backsplash, pendants, and hardware.

Photograph by Anthony Masterson

In the current family scenario, the foursome is happily ensconced in a quiet community just outside Atlanta in a two-story house they’ve made their own. “The previous owners had a very different style from us, and the entire house was more traditional,” recalls Alexandra. “It felt like Christmas in the ’90s, kind of like the McCallisters’ house in Home Alone.” Casey remembers lots of brown, dark reds, and heavy drapes. Fortunately, Casey’s mother, Rebecca Cartwright, is an interior designer who followed them to the South part-time, so she helped them reimagine the circa-2008 cottage into a lighter, more relaxed abode.

Breckenridge
“They wanted Jack’s bedroom to be a place that adults would enjoy too,” says designer Rebecca Cartwright, who is also the toddler’s grandmother. A custom daybed anchors the bedroom, which features a wallpapered ceiling that looks like wood.

Photograph by Anthony Masterson

Breckenridge
Alexandra wanted a tall desk that could double as a sewing table (when time permits, she loves to make quilts). Rebecca commissioned this striking piece from Aronson Woodworks. Alexandra’s collection of vintage Hollywood black-and-white photography decorates the house.

Photograph by Anthony Masterson

“They have an eclectic, boho look influenced by living in California,” says Cartwright. Furnishings from laidback-cool companies like Bobo Intriguing Objects and Serena & Lily fit the bill, along with a contemporary desk for Alexandra’s office that the designer had made by a woodworking company known for its unique glazes. Cheeky wallpaper and Hollywood photos add personal touches.

Breckenridge
A lumbar pillow from the Citizenry and graphic blanket contribute a boho vibe. “Rebecca has an amazing knack for picking up on personal style,” says Alexandra.

Photograph by Anthony Masterson

Alexandra and Casey give credit to Georgia as the real draw. With its thriving entertainment industry, both are able to work on projects close to their new home. “The rural areas of Georgia have an amazing sense of community we were lacking in L.A.,” says Alexandra. “We wanted our children to grow up in a place where they could play and ride their bikes that didn’t feel like a big city.”

This article appears in our Winter 2018 issue of Atlanta Magazine’s HOME.

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