Saturday, March 23, 2019

Celebrate Selma’s Civil Rights Heritage

Louretta Wimberly was one of thousands who marched on the Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 7, 1965. She walks us through Selma, Alabama, on the fiftieth anniversary of Bloody Sunday.

Marching with Selma’s foot soldiers

I have been to Selma, Alabama, at least three dozen times. My father grew up there with his grandparents and a gaggle of cousins. For much of his childhood, his front yard was a...

The Center for Civil and Human Rights connects Atlanta legacy and current conflicts

As its name suggests, the Center for Civil and Human Rights, which opens to the public on Monday, is about two struggles—the American one that was fought primarily in the South in the latter half of the twentieth century, and the worldwide one that involves oppressed peoples in distant (and not-so-distant) lands. While there’s an obvious thematic linkage between the American Civil Rights Movement and the broader human rights one, the line between them must have been a challenge for the Center’s designers to straddle. One has a built-in narrative, with a beginning and middle (if not yet an ending), and the other requires navigating the vast space beneath the human rights umbrella, whether it’s oppressed women in Africa, child laborers in Pakistan, or tortured activists in Burma.

Preview: Center for Civil and Human Rights

Nearly a decade ago, Evelyn Lowery, Juanita Abernathy, and Andrew Young met with then mayor Shirley Franklin to officially launch a project that civic leaders had been dreaming about for far longer. That vision comes to life this month as the Center for Civil and Human Rights opens its doors.

Preview: Center for Civil and Human Rights

Nearly a decade ago, Evelyn Lowery, Juanita Abernathy, and Andrew Young met with then mayor Shirley Franklin to officially launch a project that civic leaders had been dreaming about for far longer. That vision comes to life this month as the Center for Civil and Human Rights opens its doors.

Is it 1974 all over again?

In the media scrum to celebrate the fortieth anniversary of Hank Aaron’s record-breaking home run, the undercurrent—the moral—of the story was the blatant racism he faced while chasing down Babe Ruth in 1974. In many of those commemorative stories, Aaron explained that he held on to the epithet-laced letters to remind him that racism still exists. Well more than a few “fans” have gone out of their way to prove Aaron right.

Video of the Day: Rep. John Lewis dancing to Pharrell’s ‘Happy’

John Lewis may be a living legend of the civil rights movement and a longtime congressman from Georgia, but that doesn't mean he takes himself too seriously.

Flashback: The 1895 Cotton States Exposition and the Negro Building

The Negro Building was the first designated space, since Emancipation, for the showcase of African-American achievement in a white-dominated setting. Without it, the Exposition committee could have not received federal backing, and those funds appropriated from Congress, are what helped make the fair an international success.

There is a new King family legal drama

Martin Luther King Jr.'s children are no strangers to the Fulton County courthouse. Their legal dramas have been the subject of news stories for years. In the latest wrangling, brothers Dexter and Martin, filed a complaint on Friday, asking their younger sister, Bernice, to turn over MLK's Nobel Peace Prize and his Bible.

Good Ol’ Freda comes home for the holidays

This week, Chamblee High School graduate Ryan White’s critically acclaimed Beatles documentary Good Ol' Freda comes full circle in two ways. The previously untold story of Freda Kelly, the Liverpool teen who became the Fab Four’s secretary, bowed on British television Tuesday night, and on Friday Good Ol' Freda returns to White’s hometown for one last 2013 theatrical run at The Plaza Theatre.

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