Joseph Lowery

Lowery, a Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient, is nothing if not outspoken.

SCOTUS ruling forces a new strategy for DeKalb groups

Civil rights organizations in Georgia are scrambling to come up with a strategy to respond to yesterday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Commentary: Atlanta’s neglect of the Sweet Auburn district is a civic shame

A century or so ago, if a black resident of Atlanta wanted to stop for a drink after work, he’d have to go to the basement of a saloon, or sit behind a curtain or screen in the rear of a bar. Jim Crow laws, which controlled everything from what African Americans could wear (no capes) and how they got to upper floors of the Candler Building (the freight elevator), kept the races from sharing a cold beer or shot of rye side by side.

Resegregation

Mary McMullen Francis doesn’t remember many details of August 30, 1961: the dress she wore or what her mother said before she walked out the door or the names of her teachers. But she remembers how eerily empty the street was of cars and people.
Martin Luther King Jr.

The Day King Died

On the night of Thursday, April 4, 1968, Louise and I were in our bedroom at home watching television and reading the newspaper when a bulletin flashed on the screen: MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., SHOT IN MEMPHIS.

“I Have a Dream…”

If the road to Equal Opportunity is paved with the good intentions of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center For Social Change to address the experience of all people, then the implementation of their planning must surely focus on the poor and oppressed. Isn’t that what the dream was all about?

Legends, leaders on hand for civil rights center groundbreaking

The equivalent of Atlanta royalty—members of civil rights dynasties like the Kings, the Farrises, the Youngs, and the Lowerys; top city officials, including Mayors Reed, Franklin, and Massell; and c-level executives from The Coca-Cola Company, Delta, and Georgia-Pacific—all turned out Wednesday for the official groundbreaking of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights (NCCHR) at Pemberton Place.

The Atlanta Student Movement: A Look Back

At breakfast tables across Atlanta on March 9, 1960, quiet consumption of coffee, grits, and eggs was disrupted as subscribers to the Atlanta Constitution and Atlanta Daily World opened their morning papers to discover a startling full-page ad.

Leaders and Landmarks

When Donald L. Hollowell settled in Atlanta in 1951, with his law degree from Loyola University and his honorable discharge as Captain from the U.S. Army, he could enter the courthouse through the front door—but couldn't eat in the cafeteria.
Living with the Legacy Martin Luther King Children 1985

The Children of Dr. King: Living with the Legacy

"My father was sent to do a very specific job. . . . He was a God-sent man and when his work was done he moved on higher. . . ." —Yolanda Denise King

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