Captain Planet and the Planeteers set to soar to the big screen

Captain Planet and the Planeteers, Ted Turner’s favorite cartoon series is about to soar to life as a live action flick on the big screen, thanks to Sony Pictures. The Hollywood studio is in final talks to acquire the rights to the 1990s environmental 'toon series starring the eco superhero (whose powers apparently include recycling an algae-hued “business in the front, party in the back” hairdo). The series, created by Turner and his then in house environmental team at Turner, (including Captain Planet’s mom Barbara Pyle) was an attempt to work environmental themes into an action-packed cartoon series to bring awareness to the earth’s eco challenges to the Nirvana generation.

RHOA recap: The ladies land in Cape Town, property values plunge

“The Real Housewives of Atlanta” Episode 412: “South Africa: Just Like Home” recap:As our episode opens, that clinking sound you hear is the ladies on a 16-hour flight to Cape Town, South Africa. It’s also the sound being generated at the downtown Atlanta Convention and Visitors Bureau as this hot mess of a reality show flies far from our fair city for 10 days. With luggage carts crammed with designer suitcases, Phaedra Parks, NeNe Leakes, Sheree Whitfield, Kandi Burruss, Cynthia Bailey and interloping ex-con “RHOA” wannabe Marlo Hampton attempt to board the airport elevators without causing the cable to snap, ending the episode before we’re even properly buzzed on our 40-gallon drum of Goldschlager. Essentially, these women have brought enough wardrobe to clothe every man, woman and child living in South Africa.

The Artful Dodger: Jonathan Krohn

Child prodigies inspire an unsettling mix of awe, protectiveness, and peevishness in the adults around them. When young Jonathan Krohn delivered his barn-burning speech at last February’s Conservative Political Action Conference, Rush Limbaugh beamed paternally at his new mini-me, while Jon Stewart joked, “I’m not sure there’s a nurple purple enough.” “I thought Stewart’s routine was quite funny,” Krohn says. “But I declined his invitation to appear on one of his specials.” With the publication this month of his second manifesto, Defining Conservatism: The Principles That Will Bring Our Country Back (Vanguard Press), Krohn is instead expected to make the rounds of tea party protests and join the punditocracy as the boy king of Fox News. His new book has the ambitious aim of helping readers “understand the ideas, principles, and values of Conservatism,” and it expands on the principles spelled out in his first book, Define Conservatism for Past, Present, and Future Generations, self-published in 2008. Homeschooled in Duluth, he is fourteen but looks younger, a downy moppet eerily channeling William F. Buckley. In his book-jacket photo, Krohn sports a navy blazer, a flag pin, and a defiant smirk. “I have an opinion on absolutely everything,” he says as we chat over hot cocoa at a suburban coffee shop. His mother, Marla, a drama teacher, watches sidelong like a sentry as he launches into the minutiae of tort reform with such rapid-fire, hyperarticulate vehemence that his pubescent voice cracks.

Broadcast from the Bluff: Atlanta’s open-air heroin supermarket

After WABE-FM reporter and weekend anchor Jim Burress finished grabbing sound for Stuck in The Bluff: AIDS, Heroin and One Group’s Illegal Quest to Save Lives, a 30-minute documentary that airs tonight, he drove home, crawled into bed and stared at the ceiling for hours. “I could not wrap my head around everything that I saw,” he recalls of his day chronicling the work of the nonprofit Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition’s needle exchange program. “There’s the drug use and the drug sales, the nonprofit doing this work and the neighborhood itself. Spending time there forces you to ask: ‘Is this a forgotten land? Are these people basically being sentenced to a neighborhood like this because that’s the easiest solution?’ No matter what side of this issue you fall on, you’re going to be challenged as a listener hearing the stories of these people. This is a deep, complex and troubling issue.”

Drew Jubera

In South Georgia, high school football lies “somewhere between iconic and mythic,” writes journalist Drew Jubera in his first book, Must Win: A Season of Survival for a Town and Its Team (St. Martin’s Press). Jubera immersed himself in the 2010 football season of Valdosta High School, once the dominant team in the nation. In 2009 the New York Times dispatched Jubera to write about the fallout from a loss to county rival Lowndes High that seemed to mark the official end of the school’s glory days. Jubera realized right away that the story wasn’t just about football, so he spent a year commuting from his home in Atlanta and eventually took up temporary residence in Valdosta.

Gregg Allman’s Second Chance

In 2009 Gregg Allman flew to Los Angeles to record his first solo album in fourteen years. The producer was the famous T Bone Burnett. “It started off so quick,” Allman says from his home on the Georgia coast. “Right away we had four tunes. Some were first takes. There were no interruptions, no strife, no drama.”

A mysterious tower and a towering rivalry

Q. What's that large phallic symbol on the east side of the Connector with the word "Corey" on its side?Known more politely as the Corey Tower, it was originally a Georgia Power steam plant facility that provided heat to Downtown in the sixties and seventies. Eventually outmoded, it was purchased in 1994 by local entrepreneur Billy Corey, whose company specializes in billboard and airport advertising.“The ‘Power of the Tower’ i

Nursery Rhymes: MattyB

 Eight-year-old Matthew Morris confesses to having a fear of coyotes and a loathing of spinach, and he answers questions with a focused, “Yes, sir.” But give him a beat and put him in shades and a leather jacket, and he becomes MattyB—a “chyeah”-saying emcee who agilely chirps that he’s hotter than gumbo.

All Hail Terminal West

After three years of drawing ravers to grind in the gallery spaces of the King Plow Arts Center, Robert Shaw and Alan Sher have set up the permanent venue Terminal West in Studio C of the refurbished farm-equipment foundry. With high-grade sound and light systems built around a twenty-by-thirty-three-foot stage, wide concrete floors, three bars loaded with twenty-nine different canned craft beers, and a back patio facing the railroad tracks, the unce-unce dance party will be beating strong in Westside. But starting this summer, Shaw and Sher say music lovers of all ages and metronomic temperaments will find a reason to stop in. “The first few months have been electronic music; that was our network,” says Shaw. “But we’ve got reggae and bluegrass acts coming to use this amazing performance space. The goal is to diversify the audience.”

Sam Massell: It’s time to say “never again”

Last Tuesday night, huddled behind the steering wheel in an overcoat, gloves and a hat, Buckhead Coalition president Sam Massell was gridlocked on Atlanta’s main artery, stuck in the slush with the rest of us. As his usual 16-minute Buckhead commute down Peachtree Road slid into an hour, Massell, 86, had time to reflect on half a century of metro Atlanta's mass transit maladies.

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