Georgia pecan farmers

Georgia pecan farmers have thrived for a century. After Hurricane Michael, they’re unsure if they’ll survive another generation.

After Hurricane Matthew in 2016, Hurricane Irma in 2017, and Hurricane Michael in 2018, Georgia's pecan farming industry is suffering. Georgia lost a sixth of its total pecan trees from Hurricane Michael and generations of farmers lost their crops—giving them a long road to recovery. Combined with increasing tariffs, many farmers are uncertain about their future.
Waycross, Georgia cancer cluster

Why are so many people getting rare cancers in this small Georgia town?

After multiple rare cancers have been diagnosed in Waycross, Georgia, the city grapples with a profound question: What if the industries that gave us life are killing us?
Cyclorama

Redeeming the Cyclorama: Why the century-old attraction is anything but a monument to the Confederacy

Conceived in Chicago, created in Milwaukee, and premiered in Minneapolis, the Cyclorama was meant to celebrate the Union’s great triumph in capturing Atlanta and hastening the end of the Civil War. But when the painting moved South, new audiences flipped its meaning, bastardizing the spectacle into a testament to white Southern pride. For decades, it was a masterpiece of misinterpretation. Now, it has a new life at the Atlanta History Center.
Defining Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms

Keisha’s no Kasim: Inside Bottoms’s very different City Hall

Her critics worried she would be an extension of Kasim Reed. But after more than a year in office, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms wants you to know she’s leading the city on her own terms.

Asylum: Inside Central State Hospital, once the world’s largest mental institution

In 1837, Georgia lawmakers authorized a “Lunatic, Idiot, and Epileptic Asylum.” Five years later, the facility opened as the Georgia Lunatic Asylum on the outskirts of the cotton-rich town that served as the antebellum state capital.
Google Fiber

The Big Disconnect: What happened to Google Fiber in Atlanta?

It’s been more than three years since Google Fiber frenzy took hold of the Atlanta area. Google promised to change everything for folks fed up with unreliable internet connections, abysmal customer service, and expensive monthly bills. But a different reality took hold: Google ran wires, but didn't start service; Google tried to work with local governments, but couldn't work out deals; and ultimately Google couldn't find value in rolling out its service. One thing is indisputable: most Google Fiber hopefuls are now fed up.
GM ignition switch scandal

No Accident: Inside GM’s deadly ignition switch scandal

Lance Cooper was looking for answers behind a single car crash. What the attorney found led to a recall of 30 million vehicles. Inside General Motors’ deadly ignition switch scandal—and the price one Kennesaw family paid.
Robert Schneider

Apples in Stereo’s Robert Schneider gave up a flourishing music career to chase his true passion: Math

Robert Schneider was the lead singer for his band, Apples in Stereo, and cofounder of Elephant 6 Recording Co., the Athens-based creative force behind the band Neutral Milk Hotel. Now, instead of pursuing the mysticism of music, he's pursuing something that's intrinsically mysterious and fundamentally human to him: mathematics.
Where it all went wrong MARTA T-SPLOST transportation MARTA compromise of 1971

Where It All Went Wrong

Like ghosts rising out of a Confederate cemetery, Atlanta’s past lapses in judgment haunt the region today, leaving a smoky trail of suburban decay, declining home values, clogged highways, and a vastly diminished reputation.

Relentless: Putnam County Sheriff Howard Sills chases a killer

The best Howard Sills could remember, there hadn’t been a double homicide in Putnam County since May 1984, 30 years earlier. In minutes, the mood inside the lake house swung from wild intensity to who the hell did this? This, the sheriff told himself, ain’t local talent.

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