U2

U2 in Atlanta: An oral history of the band and the city’s shared journey

U2’s intersections with Atlanta over the years have gone beyond the city as a requisite tour stop. For a band from Europe intent on deconstructing the myth of America, Atlanta—its imperfect icons, its musicians, its leaders—has been a specific, if rarely noticed, part of U2’s journey, not only for the city’s social justice movements of the past but for the present, too. In anticipation of U2’s first Atlanta concert in nine years, two generations of Georgians talk about the band.
Chattahoochee River

The story of the Chattahoochee is the story of Atlanta. What is the river’s next chapter?

Today’s river is much better shape than it was in the 1970s. That feeds my optimism, but it’s the next part that gets me excited. Another stretch of the river is under restoration. If our own generation is as successful as the River Rats were 40 years ago, the green ribbon that cuts across the entire metro area will truly be a gift for all Atlantans.

Fresh vs. fast food

While food desert analysis focuses on the scarcity of supermarkets, the abundance of fast food is another major public health concern.
Yacht Rock

Confessions of a Cover Band: Yacht Rock Revue croons the hits you love to hate

Yacht Rock Revue is hard to define—they're part fandom, part joke, part self-promotion, and each element is infused with irony. But when they take the stage at Old Fourth Ward's Venkman’s, the band is fully in character, complete with gaudy shirts and sunglasses, playing music people hate. And everyone loves it.
Waycross, Georgia cancer cluster

Why are so many people getting rare cancers in this small Georgia town?

After multiple rare cancers have been diagnosed in Waycross, Georgia, the city grapples with a profound question: What if the industries that gave us life are killing us?

Asylum: Inside Central State Hospital, once the world’s largest mental institution

In 1837, Georgia lawmakers authorized a “Lunatic, Idiot, and Epileptic Asylum.” Five years later, the facility opened as the Georgia Lunatic Asylum on the outskirts of the cotton-rich town that served as the antebellum state capital.

A Georgia sperm bank, a troubled donor, and the secretive business of babymaking

When customers of Xytex uncovered the truth about one of its sperm donors, Chris Aggeles, the disclosure set off more than a dozen lawsuits—exposing an industry that can shatter lives while helping to create them.
Morris Brown

Morris Brown College used to enroll 2,500 students. Today, there are 40.

After losing accreditation and selling buildings, officials at the school—the first institution of higher learning in Georgia founded by black people, for black people—say it’s rebuilding. Faith abounds, but is it enough?

Market Movers

"It sounds preposterous," the New York Times declared. “A businessman from Atlanta blows into New York and walks off with the colonnaded high temple of American capitalism. No more will New York be the master of the New York Stock Exchange.”
Georgia pecan farmers

Georgia pecan farmers have thrived for a century. After Hurricane Michael, they’re unsure if they’ll survive another generation.

After Hurricane Matthew in 2016, Hurricane Irma in 2017, and Hurricane Michael in 2018, Georgia's pecan farming industry is suffering. Georgia lost a sixth of its total pecan trees from Hurricane Michael and generations of farmers lost their crops—giving them a long road to recovery. Combined with increasing tariffs, many farmers are uncertain about their future.

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