Jason Carter: The Inevitable Candidate

Jason Carter has smarts, charisma, and an incomparable pedigree. He also has just four years in elected office, and he’s running for governor in a state that has little tolerance for his political party. Can a man who’s been building the resume for this campaign since he was a teenager save the Democrats in Georgia?

Communal Commuting

When a subway train first begins to whine and shimmy as it pulls away from a station, for an instant everything inside is suspended. The g-forces have just begun to exert their will on the bodies inside the train cars, but the bodies haven’t yet had a chance to respond.

The Big Break

The teachers began to notice him at the beginning of the 2010 school year, the stranger in a red pickup truck and lizard-skin boots.

What I learned taking the food stamp challenge

The rules are simple. You can spend only the equivalent of your state’s average weekly SNAP allowance, which at the time in Georgia was $33.98. You can’t accept any outside food or eat restaurant meals, and, except for condiments, can’t use anything already in your pantry or refrigerator.

“We Cannot Waste a Single Day”

For children with brain tumors—and for their families—the struggles that come after a diagnosis can be unimaginable. Candice Dyer explores how some parents are lightening the burden for those who will come next, whether by establishing a biorepository for scientists, lobbying for more research dollars, or simply helping a family with its bills.
Gene Patterson

Gene Patterson’s papers reveal the stories behind events that forever changed the South

The papers, which Patterson housed at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg for many years, spill over in hundreds of confidential memos, personal letters, comedic repartee with fellow journalists, gossip, and accumulated materials of his estimable life and career.

The Crossing

The train that killed DeKai Amonrasi no longer exists. CSX Q612 out of New Orleans met its end at Tilford Rail Yard near Marietta Boulevard, a few miles west of Berkeley Heights on Atlanta’s west side.

The Long Goodbye

We thought Daddy was going to die in 2001. He was staggering around the house in his underwear, gasping in pain, his eyes hollow, his face slashed from shaving with an old-fashioned safety razor. He was eighty-two years old.

Stories from Camp

In 1993 Camp Twin Lakes opened on 500 wooded acres outside of Rutledge. Today the facility has thirty air-conditioned cabins, a medical lodge, a horse-riding ring, and a pool with a fifty-foot waterslide.

Virgin Harvest

On a soggy Autumn morning, Jason Shaw was standing in a sandy field and considering the irony of his new calling as a missionary of Southern olives. “The first olive I ever saw was in a martini,” he joked.

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