The world’s tiniest Walmart opens in Atlanta

Walmart made retail history today by opening its smallest store ever. While a tiny Walmart—the store near Georgia Tech's campus is around 2,500 square feet—seems like an oxymoron, don’t let the size fool you.

Broadcast from the Bluff: Atlanta’s open-air heroin supermarket

After WABE-FM reporter and weekend anchor Jim Burress finished grabbing sound for Stuck in The Bluff: AIDS, Heroin and One Group’s Illegal Quest to Save Lives, a 30-minute documentary that airs tonight, he drove home, crawled into bed and stared at the ceiling for hours. “I could not wrap my head around everything that I saw,” he recalls of his day chronicling the work of the nonprofit Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition’s needle exchange program. “There’s the drug use and the drug sales, the nonprofit doing this work and the neighborhood itself. Spending time there forces you to ask: ‘Is this a forgotten land? Are these people basically being sentenced to a neighborhood like this because that’s the easiest solution?’ No matter what side of this issue you fall on, you’re going to be challenged as a listener hearing the stories of these people. This is a deep, complex and troubling issue.”
Gentrification in Kirkwood

How gentrification really changes a neighborhood

To neighbors, she was “Miss Anna,” and to her children, she was the strictest, strongest woman in Kirkwood.
Mechanicsville Atlanta, GA

Six reasons to love Mechanicsville

The neighborhood takes its name from rail workers in the 1880s, but it was also home to many prosperous Jewish merchants and, later, influential African American entrepreneurs.
Celebrities in Atlanta

These are the neighborhoods celebrities stay in while filming in Atlanta

As Hollywood continues to choose Atlanta as a prime filming destination—Georgia productions generated more than $9.5 billion in impact last year—actors, crews, and other talent are infiltrating Atlanta neighborhoods and sometimes even setting down roots. From Buckhead to Midtown to Pinewood Forest, here’s where they hang their hats.
Home Park

Six reasons to love Home Park

Bordered on the north by Atlantic Station and the south by ­Georgia Tech, Home Park is in the heart of west Midtown. And yet the compact neighborhood remains somewhat hidden in plain sight—well, as hidden as a neighborhood can be when it abuts a premier university and a sprawling outdoor mall and entertainment complex.

Mayor Reed to Braves: You’re my favorite team–I just can’t give you enough tax dollars

At today's press conference, Mayor Kasim Reed announced that the sixty-acre tract currently occupied by Turner Field and acres of asphalt will be developed into housing for middle-income residents.

Do financial projections for the new Braves stadium add up?

If the new Atlanta Braves stadium becomes the economic engine that boosters predict, it would be as likely as seeing Julio Teheran throw a perfect game. Economists say they know of no major league ballparks that justify their public subsidies. "Study after study after study agrees with this finding," said sports economist J.C. Bradbury of Kennesaw State University. "People don’t even study it any more, it’s so non-controversial."

Reynoldstown A to Z

"A community's personality can really be reflected in signs and typography," says graphic designer and SCAD Atlanta professor James Burns, whose Reynoldstown alphabet includes graffiti, church signs, storefronts, and a steel plant.

The Center for Civil and Human Rights connects Atlanta legacy and current conflicts

As its name suggests, the Center for Civil and Human Rights, which opens to the public on Monday, is about two struggles—the American one that was fought primarily in the South in the latter half of the twentieth century, and the worldwide one that involves oppressed peoples in distant (and not-so-distant) lands. While there’s an obvious thematic linkage between the American Civil Rights Movement and the broader human rights one, the line between them must have been a challenge for the Center’s designers to straddle. One has a built-in narrative, with a beginning and middle (if not yet an ending), and the other requires navigating the vast space beneath the human rights umbrella, whether it’s oppressed women in Africa, child laborers in Pakistan, or tortured activists in Burma.

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