Dad’s Garage and other businesses ousted from Inman Park locations

Eighteen years after its founding, Dad’s Garage Theatre will soon be leaving its familiar Inman Park industrial-building home—but not by choice. In fact, the entire 3.4-acre, arrowhead-shaped parcel at Elizabeth Street and North Highland and Lake avenues—a site that also contains the popular Victory Sandwich Bar and several other businesses—is to be leveled to make room for a $45 million apartment and retail complex.

It’s going to take more than $45 million* to help Vine City

When it comes to building stuff, Atlanta’s got a great history of public-private partnership. Civic leaders come up with an idea, City Hall irons out the political wrinkles, and then Coke, Delta, the Home Depot, and other hometown companies contribute funding. It’s how Atlanta won the Braves and the Olympics. On the other hand, our track record of taking care of people in the process of building things—large venues in particular—is lousy.

Forbes: Atlanta’s more miserable than Poughkeepsie, less than Detroit

So, according to the numbers-crunchers at Forbes, metro Atlanta is the sixteenth most miserable city in the country. Civic boosters should probably be thankful that the magazine dropped two of its misfortune indicators—pro sports and political corruption.

Atlanta is less affordable than New York, Boston and San Francisco?

If you know people in New York, San Francisco, Boston or D.C., you've probably had some form of the "I can't believe how cheap it is to live in Atlanta" conversation.

The rent (in Atlanta) is too damn high

I've read a lot of stories over the past year pointing out that, in several U.S. cities, it is now cheaper to buy a home than it is rent one. Because these sort of statistics are usually generated using city-wide averages, I assumed the "buying is cheaper than renting" condition was true only if you have good enough credit to obtain a mortgage at the lowest rates.

The worst neighbors in Newton County

Last Thursday in Porterdale (approximately 35 miles east of Atlanta), Jean-Joseph and Angelica Kalonji arrived at their son's just-purchased home to change the locks for him. Vacant for seven months, the home and the 11 acres of land on which it sat were in foreclosure.

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