You can buy a town for $2.45 million

Frank Mills’s home at 246 Main Street in the town of Toomsboro, forty miles east of Macon in Wilkinson County, is not for sale. This would not be particularly noteworthy if not for the fact that practically the entire town around this eighty-nine-year-old man is.

The iconic Randolph-Lucas House has found a savior

The beleaguered but beloved red brick mansion on Peachtree Road at Lindbergh Drive has finally found a savior. This summer, NewTown Partners, an Atlanta-based economic development consulting firm specializing in historic preservation, will move the home to 78 Peachtree Circle, an empty lot in Ansley Park, where it will become the private home of company founders Christopher Jones and Roger Smith.

Atlanta No. 4 for suburban poverty growth

Time to rethink your stereotypes. For decades the term “inner city” has been shorthand for "poor." But, as a study released by the Brookings Institution yesterday reveals, poverty is growing faster in U.S. suburbs than in cities, and Atlanta has the dubious distinction of being a trendsetter.

Collier Heights awarded Local Historic District status

At long last, Collier Heights—a West Atlanta neighborhood built by and for African Americans—has been designated as a Local Historic District by the City of Atlanta, the mayor's office announced today.

Atlanta: Most redneck city in the USA?

Consider, as they say, the source. The same folks over at the Movoto real estate blog who recently decreed Atlanta the most nerdy city in the U.S. have now dubbed us "most redneck."

The redneck-calculation methodology developed by Movoto's Natalie Grigson includes: percentage of high school dropouts; number of gun stores, taxidermists, Walmarts, country music stations, and Western gear vendors; and proximity to a NASCAR track. Also lawn mower repair stores.

Alright, Natalie. We'll concede on most of the findings—especially the guns and dropouts. But did you have to make a Jeff Foxworthy reference? We'd have gone with the Stone Mountain laser show.

Does a Mableton experiment hold the answer for aging Atlantans?

The corner of Clay and Floyd roads in south Cobb County looks like any suburban intersection: mega RaceTrac gas station, Food Depot grocery store with a gargantuan parking lot, cars whizzing by to beat the traffic light.

Lakewood/Metropolitan plan spurs hope that this time is different

Beginning next week, the residents of Capitol View, Sylvan Hills, Lakewood Heights, and other Southeast Atlanta neighborhoods will get a chance to review the latest proposal to fix a long-neglected part of town.

Georgia ranks No. 8 for ‘severe housing cost burden’

Yes, the rent is too damn high, according to the 2013 "Housing Landscape" report published last week by the Center for Housing Policy. The Center concluded that housing problems are getting worse for working renters, because, while incomes have gone—and stayed—down, rents have gone up —and are still going up.

Dad’s Garage and other businesses ousted from Inman Park locations

Eighteen years after its founding, Dad’s Garage Theatre will soon be leaving its familiar Inman Park industrial-building home—but not by choice. In fact, the entire 3.4-acre, arrowhead-shaped parcel at Elizabeth Street and North Highland and Lake avenues—a site that also contains the popular Victory Sandwich Bar and several other businesses—is to be leveled to make room for a $45 million apartment and retail complex.

It’s going to take more than $45 million* to help Vine City

When it comes to building stuff, Atlanta’s got a great history of public-private partnership. Civic leaders come up with an idea, City Hall irons out the political wrinkles, and then Coke, Delta, the Home Depot, and other hometown companies contribute funding. It’s how Atlanta won the Braves and the Olympics. On the other hand, our track record of taking care of people in the process of building things—large venues in particular—is lousy.

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