Did Leo Frank kill Mary Phagan? 106 years later, we might finally find out for sure.

In early may, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard announced that he will reopen one of the most notorious criminal proceedings in American history: the trial of National Pencil Company superintendent Leo M. Frank for the murder of child laborer Mary Phagan.
Learn before you burn

Learn before you burn: What to know about Atlanta’s new marijuana law

Atlanta City Council voted unanimously to pass legislation that will decrease penalties for less than an ounce of marijuana possession. But misinformation about the law started spreading as soon as the vote was passed. Here's every question you have about the new ordinance, answered.
South Fulton marijuana law

The city of South Fulton passed a new marijuana ordinance. Here’s what you need to know.

In a 5-2 vote, the South Fulton city council agreed to lighten the punishment for possessing less than an ounce of marijuana to a maximum of a $150 fine with no jail time—making the punishment for pot possession more akin to a traffic citation. After Clarkston and Atlanta, this makes South Fulton the third city in metro Atlanta to reduce the penalty for possessing a small amount of pot.
The Fall Line

The Fall Line: Two podcasting sleuths revisit the cases of abducted Grady newborns

The Fall Line is investigating the cases of seven Grady newborns who went missing decades ago—two of whom were never found. Inspired other true-crime dramas like Serial, Laurah Norton, a writer and Georgia State University senior lecturer, and Brooke Gently-Hargrove, a grief counselor, launched the true-crime serial podcast last year, which has since racked up 2.3 million listens.
Tyrone Brooks

Tyrone Brooks sentenced to federal prison for a year and a day

After a weeklong sentencing hearing, a judge orders the civil rights leader behind bars for misuse of nonprofit donations.

Predictive policing crime prevention software successful for APD

Atlanta Police Lieutenant LeAnne Browning recalls her days as a patrol officer. “Our lieutenants would say, ‘Okay, I want you to look at the beat books so you can know what’s out there on your beat.’ Well, the beat books are like this thick with reports,” she says, holding her hands a couple of feet apart. “And you’d sit there and thumb through it all, and there was no time because they were then kicking you out of the precinct to handle calls.” She pauses before pointing to her computer screen. “That’s the old way of doing things. This­—it’s right here.”

Fighting to kneel: A Kennesaw State University cheerleader sues for the right to protest on the playing field

Similar to San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, five cheerleaders for Kennesaw State University decided to kneel during the national anthem at a football game to protest unjustified killings by police officers. When the school decided to move them off the field if they were going to kneel, Tommia Dean, one of the cheerleaders, filed a lawsuit against the school's higher ups for restricting her freedom of speech.

Andrea Sneiderman sentenced

Today the trial of Andrea Sneiderman ended where it began—on the witness stand of Courtroom 5-D at the DeKalb County Courthouse. There clad in jailhouse orange, she sobbed and begged Superior Court Judge Gregory Adams for leniency: “Please let me go home.”
Tex McIver

We’ll know next week whether Tex McIver will accept a plea bargain

If no plea deal is reached, Tex McIver’s trial is slated to begin October 30. In court today, chief prosecutor Clint Rucker also argued that a 1990 incident in which McIver set loose his two German Shepherds on a red Mustang near his house on Cravey Trail in northeast Atlanta, then fired his gun at the car, would be relevant for a jury to hear.
Erika Shields

The Chief: Erika Shields wants to change the way Atlanta police tackle crime

Atlanta Police Department chief Erika Shields has a lot of progressive ideas, such as having APD build relationships with the city’s top 100 young offenders to help break the vicious cycle of arrests and jail. But will Atlanta's next mayor keep her around?

Follow Us

69,386FansLike
144,836FollowersFollow
493,480FollowersFollow

NEWSLETTERS