Did Leo Frank kill Mary Phagan? 106 years later, we might finally find out for sure.

In early may, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard announced that he will reopen one of the most notorious criminal proceedings in American history: the trial of National Pencil Company superintendent Leo M. Frank for the murder of child laborer Mary Phagan.
Erika Shields

The Chief: Erika Shields wants to change the way Atlanta police tackle crime

Atlanta Police Department chief Erika Shields has a lot of progressive ideas, such as having APD build relationships with the city’s top 100 young offenders to help break the vicious cycle of arrests and jail. But will Atlanta's next mayor keep her around?
Learn before you burn

Learn before you burn: What to know about Atlanta’s new marijuana law

Atlanta City Council voted unanimously to pass legislation that will decrease penalties for less than an ounce of marijuana possession. But misinformation about the law started spreading as soon as the vote was passed. Here's every question you have about the new ordinance, answered.
Deep Undercover by Jack Barsky

Jack Barsky was a KGB spy with a double life. Today, he’s a dad living in Covington, Georgia.

Anyone who’s watched an episode of The Americans, the FX series about Russian spies living undercover during the Cold War, has gotten a taste of the life Jack Barsky lived for more than 10 years as what U.S. intelligence called an “illegal.”
Capital punishment syringes

Why did Georgia execute more prisoners in 2016 than any other state?

Last year, at a time when the use of death penalty had dropped to historic lows nationwide, Georgia executed nine people convicted of murder, more than any other state. Don’t expect that pace to continue.
Payne Lindsey

What inspired Payne Lindsey to create the Up and Vanished podcast

With several more episodes to go in his scheduled series, Payne Lindsey looks forward to following new evidence—and even hopes to persuade Ryan Duke to do a jail house interview. “My audience has learned, as I have, not to jump to conclusions,” he says. “We just want to find the truth—wherever it leads.”
Emmett Bass

After he escaped prison, Emmett Bass spent 27 years on the run

Emmett Bass is a gambling man. In 1975 he and another man were arrested in Henry County for armed robbery of a package store. Bass was convicted and given a 15-year sentence. Three years later, on April 3, 1978, Bass was on a work detail near Highway 16 in Griffin when he went to relieve himself in the trees. Instead of returning to where his fellow inmates were cleaning ditches in the hot sun, he continued deeper into the woods.

Once fugitive banker Aubrey Lee Price gets 30 years

This morning, U.S. District Court Judge B. Avant Edenfield sentenced Aubrey Lee Price—the Georgia pastor who became an investment adviser, then a banker, then a fugitive—to a maximum of 30 years in prison stemming from a Ponzi scheme that evoked comparisons to the one masterminded by Bernie Madoff. The amount of restitution Price will owe to those he swindled is still to be determined, though it will likely be in the $46 million range.
Spinrilla

Mixtape mix-up: Why the RIAA is taking Spinrilla to court

The DIY nature of mixtapes is crucial to understanding the success of Spinrilla, a mixtape website and app founded in 2013 by Dylan Copeland after he left Georgia State University.

When is a knockoff a rip-off? An Atlanta artist finds the answer with a lawsuit

From the rigid and amateurish brushstrokes, the piano that caught Zheng Li’s eye in Z Gallerie definitely was not his work. But the angle and shape of the instrument—and even the color palette—were almost identical to his 2004 Piano No. 9.

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