News & Opinion

News about Atlanta issues, arts, events, and more

In Tune: Warren Hudson, owner of Decatur CD

After Decatur CD owner Warren Hudson had sent a dozen customers to Walmart for the new DVD from local country sensations Sugarland because of their exclusive distribution deal with the big-box retailer, he made his disapproval public by penning an open letter to the band. It stated, “By shutting the door on independent record

In Tune: Drivin’ N’ Cryin’

Drivin’ N’ Cryin’ didn’t set out to take a twelve-year hiatus. For the decade and a half following its formation in 1985, the Atlanta band was tireless, putting out eight albums and touring with bands such as the Who, the Allman Brothers, and R.E.M. The success of 1991’s “Fly Me Courageous” and R

Candy bars and childhood scars

Q: I live in Midtown. Where should I take my kids trick-or-treating for a really good time? A good intown experience (without the masked hordes) can be had in Ansley Park. As a precocious young candy hoarder who took fetishistic pleasure in accumulating, organizing, and locking away his candy stash, I found the Midtown neighborhood aerobically and navigationally challenging—wide, labyrinthine streets with long, regal driveways—but rewarding. I still have my perso

The Shelf: Philip Lee Williams, The Clinton Tapes, and Hand Me My Travelin’ Shoes

Philip Lee Williams Athens resident Philip Lee Williams writes fiction with the authority of a historian, the ear of a poet, and the eye of a journalist. The author of ten nov

In Tune: Bryan-Michael Cox

Songwriter, producer, and four-time Grammy Award–winner Bryan-Michael Cox—aka B. Cox—is the man behind some of R&B’s biggest hits, including number ones for Usher (“Burn”), Mariah Carey (“Don’t Forget About Us”), and Mary J. Blige (“Be Without You”). The single thirty-one-year-old is based in Atlanta, but you’re just as likely to find him in L.A., Houston, or New York, writing for artists such as Toni Braxton, Ron I

The Shelf: Misfortunate Son and Sorrow Wood

Misfortunate Son The brilliantly subversive

In Tune: Lovell Sisters

In 2005, Jessica Lovell, now twenty-three, was nearly through her premed program at Shorter College in Rome, Georgia, when she and younger sisters Megan, twenty, and Rebecca, eighteen, played one of their first gigs as a band—to a listening audience of more than 4 million. The show? A Prairie Home Companion’s teen talent contest on NPR, which the Calhoun, Georgia, trio won with their practiced vocal harmonies, wholesome vibe, and blend of acoustic country and bluegrass. As listene

Giddy-up, officer

Q: Why does the APD still use horses? Whenever I see a cop on a horse, I chuckle. How can a species that is more prey than predator fight big-city crime? “They can maneuver through crowds and push [the crowd] back by their sheer size,” says Allison Ashe, of the Atlanta Police Foundation. “They can also navig

Broken windows and shattered expectations

Q: Why the hold-up in getting the Westin’s windows fixed? On March 14 of last year, I got a frantic call from my mother, who was barricaded in her Midtown basement. There was an edge to her voice I hadn’t heard since she phoned me the morning of September 11, 2001, as I slept through world history in my Providence, Rhode Island, dorm room. “There’s a tornado in Atlanta,” she said. It seemed as likely as locusts, or a

In Tune: Collective Soul

The four members of Collective Soul spent nearly three months in lead vocalist Ed Roland’s South Carolina lakeside cabin earlier this year, swimming, playing Ping-Pong, and most importantly, writing and recording their latest release, due out August 25. Their second self-titled album, referred to as the “rabbit record” be

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