News & Opinion

News about Atlanta issues, arts, events, and more

The Walking Dead Locations fan site put together a helpful Google Walking Dead map.

Totally awesome Walking Dead map

I don't know about you; but I spend half of each Walking Dead episode squinting at the scenery trying to figure out exactly where in metro Atlanta—aka zombie capital of the USA—that particular zombie gut spill occurred. The good folks at the Walking Dead Locations fan site have put together a helpful Google map that you can use to track the location of every kill, splat, and melodramatic Glenn-Maggie spat. Enjoy

Pay hike makes council jobs more enticing, challengers come out early

Back in December, the Atlanta City Council raised some eyebrows by giving itself a future salary increase far beyond the typical cost-of-living, consumer-price-index variety. When the dust settled on the 10–4 vote, council pay for the upcoming term jumped more than 50 percent, to just over $60,000 beginning in 2014.

We’re No. 1! According to us!

Yet to those who root for pro sports (and, I hope, those who play them) the night felt unmistakably like a consolation prize. We were told repeatedly how lucky we are to be here in this world-class sports town. We were reminded that the New York media was against us. We were so showered with love and self-serving praise that you almost expected, say, a Boston sports fan to leave behind his seven titles in the last twelve years so he could come down and buy season tickets to half-empty Turner Field.

Viola Davis, a Brown v. Board veteran, gets into the DeKalb School Board battle

Viola Davis was destined to battle the powers that be. She grew up in Topeka, Kansas, and at six, walked down the street to first grade at Monroe Elementary, a two-story, red-brick school that now is part of a museum commemorating the famous 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education desegregation case. Now Davis is at the crest of a wave of angry DeKalb residents, so angry that they have abandoned the usual blame-game between north and south DeKalb to come together against the school board.

Um, about that streetcar…?

A century ago, streetcars were Atlanta’s proverbial lifeblood, connecting Downtown to “suburbs” like Inman Park, Druid Hills, and the West End. Even as cars became common in the 1920s and 1930s, Atlantans continued commuting by trolley, streetcar, and intercity train.

Flashback: Larry Flynt shot in Lawrenceville

On that warm March afternoon, what pastor Fred Musser first thought was the sound of freight palettes dropping from a truck turned out to be the crack of a .44 caliber Marlin rifle—a weapon designed to kill large game.

Does SCOTUS have any business reviewing the Voting Rights Act?

To veteran Atlanta litigator Emmet Bondurant, however, the question isn’t whether the rightward-tilting Court is likely to lift the requirement that Georgia, Mississippi, and other states with histories of black voter suppression obtain Justice Department “pre-clearance” for any measures that affect voters. (Hint: Is the pope-emeritus Catholic?) To Bondurant, the real mystery is why the Court has any business reviewing the law at all.

Finally saying goodbye to the birthday car tax

This month Georgia’s long-loathed ad valorem fee—better known as “that @#$?!* birthday car tax”—becomes history. But don’t celebrate too fast.

Apparently the von Trapps (yes, as in “doe, a deer”) have been hanging around the ATL

Well, we all know Justin Bieber got his start thanks to Atlanta's star-grooming machine. But the great grandkids of Captain Georg von Trapp? Turns out Sophi, 24, Melanie, 22, Amanda, 21, and August, 18—What? no Liesl or Friedrich?—have been in town working with vocal coach Jan Smith, whose client roster includes the Biebs, Usher, and Rob Thomas. Although we were hoping for goatherds and edelweiss, the video of the von Trapps and another family band, Alpharetta's Von Grey, doing the folky "Crying Bloody Water" in studio is kind of adorable.

GOP lawmakers don’t trust Fulton to run itself

When Republicans in the General Assembly redrew district lines in 2011 to give themselves majority control over local legislation in Fulton County, they made no secret of their intent to rein in a county government they believed was bloated, profligate, and unresponsive to the residents of its northern end—while brushing aside the racially fraught image of white politicians disciplining black elected officials.

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