This historical West Wesley house inspires whimsy and mystery

This is a circa-1930, French-influenced, fairytale abode

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West Wesley circa-1930 house

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

“It’s a storyteller,” says architect Brandon Ingram of the eclectic, French-influenced house on a hill along West Wesley. “The closer you get, the more it reveals.” Ingram has admired the circa-1930 house since he was an architecture student at Georgia Tech nearly two decades ago. Its fanciful turret is apparent from the street, but up close, romantic details appear, including dogwood flowers pressed onto original gutters, custom slate roof tiles, and perfectly patinaed painted brick. “It would be nearly impossible to replicate today,” says Ingram. The home’s original architects, Atlanta’s Charles Frazier and Daniel Bodin, were prolific classicists who designed many of Old Atlanta’s celebrated residences—though, today, their names are often overlooked. “It’s brilliant the way they nestled the house into the site,” says Ingram, “which adds to its mystery.” Ingram, who is working on an addition and updating the interiors, says the house had been thoughtfully expanded at least once, adding to the layers of history to peel back. Despite its fine pedigree, the house is not overly formal. “It never really takes itself too seriously,” he says. “It’s not overly high style or pretentious. It’s whimsical.”

West Wesley circa-1930 house

Photograph by Anthony-Masterson

This article appears in our Summer 2019 issue of Atlanta Magazine’s HOME.

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