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Tom Houck Civil Rights Tour

New Tour: Tom Houck’s Civil Rights Tour

Civil Rights Tour Atlanta, a new three-hour tour organized by Houck, the former aide and driver to Martin Luther King Jr., offers an insider’s perspective into the daily lives of Atlanta’s heralded activists.
Hamilton Jordan Boy from Georgia

In a new memoir, Hamilton Jordan recalls how a visit from Martin Luther King Jr. changed his views

At the age of 17, during the following winter, I saw King’s first march in Albany. Despite pleas in the Albany Herald for its white readers to refrain from glorifying these “trouble-makers and outside agitators,” my father surprised me by inviting me to go downtown with him one Saturday morning to witness King’s first march.
Andrew Young

42. Andrew Young

Young’s legacy as an Atlanta mayor, congressman, ambassador to the United Nations, and a key member of Martin Luther King Jr.’s inner circle during the civil rights movement has given him a standing unique among leaders of his generation.
John Lewis

14. John Lewis

John Lewis is in the midst of a victory lap right now. The longtime Democratic congressman, the last of the surviving “Big Six” leaders of the civil rights movement, has spent the past several years honoring the legacy of the Selma march, paying tribute to the 1965 Voting Rights Act, and occasionally joining in nonviolent protests.

Julian Bond, a ‘true civil rights trailblazer,’ dies at 75

President Barack Obama on local civil rights legend: "Julian Bond helped change this country for the better. And what better way to be remembered than that.”

Celebrate Selma’s Civil Rights Heritage

Louretta Wimberly was one of thousands who marched on the Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 7, 1965. She walks us through Selma, Alabama, on the fiftieth anniversary of Bloody Sunday.

The Center for Civil and Human Rights

A stunning addition to downtown Atlanta, the Center connects triumphs of the past with today’s global struggles. The Center showcases Atlanta’s civil rights legacy, and also reminds us that, although we have come a long way, we have not yet overcome.

The Center for Civil and Human Rights connects Atlanta legacy and current conflicts

As its name suggests, the Center for Civil and Human Rights, which opens to the public on Monday, is about two struggles—the American one that was fought primarily in the South in the latter half of the twentieth century, and the worldwide one that involves oppressed peoples in distant (and not-so-distant) lands. While there’s an obvious thematic linkage between the American Civil Rights Movement and the broader human rights one, the line between them must have been a challenge for the Center’s designers to straddle. One has a built-in narrative, with a beginning and middle (if not yet an ending), and the other requires navigating the vast space beneath the human rights umbrella, whether it’s oppressed women in Africa, child laborers in Pakistan, or tortured activists in Burma.

Preview: Center for Civil and Human Rights

Nearly a decade ago, Evelyn Lowery, Juanita Abernathy, and Andrew Young met with then mayor Shirley Franklin to officially launch a project that civic leaders had been dreaming about for far longer. That vision comes to life this month as the Center for Civil and Human Rights opens its doors.

Preview: Center for Civil and Human Rights

Nearly a decade ago, Evelyn Lowery, Juanita Abernathy, and Andrew Young met with then mayor Shirley Franklin to officially launch a project that civic leaders had been dreaming about for far longer. That vision comes to life this month as the Center for Civil and Human Rights opens its doors.

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