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The real problem with Georgia’s Kindergarten cut-off

Kindergarten cut-off dates vary throughout the country. Georgia has long been part of a large pack of states with a September 1 cutoff, although a new bill may change that. Lawmakers have proposed moving the date up one month to August 1 for the 2016-2017 school year, and then to July 1 beginning in 2017-2018. In other parts of the country, the cut-off date is as early as June 1.

General Assembly vs. The General Assembly

This month, a school for entrepreneurs called General Assembly opens in Ponce City Market—days after Georgia lawmakers of the same collective name convene under the Gold Dome. One General Assembly offers tech-focused courses, such as digital marketing and web development. The other is likely to propose many things that’ll never happen.

Utopian Ambition: A Clayton County charter school challenges the status quo

The students of Utopian Academy for the Arts are being called on the carpet. Yesterday, their middle school mischief found the classic victim: a substitute teacher. The seventh-grade science room grew so loud that the classes on either side could hear the commotion through the walls.

Big Projects on Atlanta School Campuses

For parents who want proof that chipping in for those capital campaigns can deliver: Several shiny new buildings and facilities opened on campuses across metro Atlanta this year, with upgrades ranging from high-tech to hands-on.

Mount Vernon Presbyterian School

Believing that kids learn best when they’re not stuck behind desks in boring classrooms, Mount Vernon Presbyterian School created $500,000 open-concept flex spaces in the lower school.

Q&A with Atlanta Public Schools superintendent Meria Carstarphen

As students return to the classroom this month, newly appointed Atlanta Public Schools superintendent Meria Carstarphen faces the daunting challenge of restoring public faith in APS.

Essay: I’m glad my kids go to Atlanta Public Schools

I admit I was irked three years ago when my son—then in the second grade and still the bluest-eyed, palest-skinned kid you’ll ever meet—announced that he wanted to be called Francisco. Francis, the name we gave him at birth, and Frankie, the nickname he wore so adorably, were both out.

HOPE Scholarship: The cons

The letter arrived about three years too late. Six, really, but who’s counting? It said my younger son had been admitted to the University of Georgia. He’d put in his transfer application during a moment of uncertainty, but then decided to stay at Elon University in North Carolina. When both of my boys graduated from high school—each with HOPE-eligible GPAs—they wanted UGA or nothing.

HOPE Scholarship: The pros

The HOPE scholarship program was launched two decades ago with three specific goals: increase the number of Georgians with postsecondary education, improve the overall quality of the state’s university system, and stanch the exodus of high-achieving students. HOPE has accomplished all three aims—and then some. Over the past two decades, the number of Georgians with college degrees increased from 19 to 28 percent.

Special report: HOPE Scholarship at 20

When the first HOPE scholars were freshmen twenty years ago, Georgia’s scholarship program looked very different from today. It covered two years of tuition at any public college in Georgia for B students whose household income was $66,000 or less.

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