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Flux Night

Atlanta’s best public art party, Flux Night, returns after a two-year hiatus

In 2009, an investment analyst named Louis Corrigan saw the opportunity for temporary public art to galvanize the city’s artists, who had been hit hard by the economic crash. Inspired by Le Flash he fronted $200,000 to launch Flux Projects. It's best known for hosting Flux Night, the one-night-only public art celebration, which returns on September 27 after a two-year hiatus to host its first multinight showing in Grant Park.

Nick Cave’s Soundsuits brings found object sculpture to life

When we think of sculpture, noisemaking costumes crafted from found objects don’t usually come to mind. But Chicago-based artist Nick Cave has always defied categorization, creating works that straddle performance art, sculpture, and dance. Sponsored by Flux Projects, Cave’s new work, "Up Right Atlanta," is a collaboration with local choreographer T. Lang.

Louis Corrigan

As evidence for the maxim that one person can indeed make a difference, consider that, all by his lonesome, arts enthusiast Louis Corrigan gave more money to local arts groups last year than the entire Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs. Corrigan, a successful investment firm research analyst, is the majority funder of Flux Projects, which sponsors creative installations and performances around the city, and he provides about 40 percent of the backing for professional dance troupe gloATL. But he’s not simply a modern Medici seeking a tax write-off; in keeping with his financial background, Corrigan leverages his assets so the grassroots community gets the biggest bang from his bucks. Through his nonprofit foundation, Possible Futures, he targets grants to enable arts journalism websites artsatl.com and burnaway.org to cover and promote local goings-on. Through Flux and his support for gloATL, Corrigan underwrites public arts projects in such highly visible venues as Freedom Park and Centennial Olympic Park, with the aim of reaching audiences that might not otherwise seek out experimental visual art, photography, or dance.

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