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The Coffee Shop 1961

Flashback: How student sit-ins in downtown Atlanta sparked change in the 1960s

Over four consecutive days in February 1961, roughly 80 activists—including nine at a coffee shop on Forsyth Street—were arrested and refused bail, testing the limits of the county jail.
Nikole Hannah-Jones 1619 Project Morehouse

Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones: “I want everyone to read [the 1619 Project] because it’s the American story”

The 1619 Project, published last summer in the New York Times Magazine, is a groundbreaking look at the modern legacy of slavery. Former Atlanta resident and award-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones spoke at Morehouse College last week about the project and its impact.
Equal Rights Amendment 1982

Flashback: January 18, 1982, when Georgians urged lawmakers to pass the Equal Rights Amendment

A decade after Congress approved the Equal Rights Amendment in 1972 guaranteeing women the same legal protections as men, Georgia remained on the fence.
Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow

A new exhibition at the Atlanta History Center documents Georgia’s earliest civil rights heroes

Starting January 18, the Atlanta History Center will honor Campbell, one of the first black men elected to the General Assembly, and more of the state’s pre–World War I civil rights advocates as part of the New-York Historical Society’s Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow.
Fox Theatre 90th anniversary

The Fox Theatre at 90: Nine iconic moments in Fox history

The city of Atlanta received perhaps its greatest Christmas gift when the Fabulous Fox Theatre opened to the public on December 25, 1929. A look back at some of its biggest moments.
CDC in Atlanta, 1945

Before battling ebola, the CDC began in downtown Atlanta with one focus: malaria

The Communicable Disease Center, first located on Peachtree Street in downtown, initially focused on eradicating malaria. But Dr. Joseph Mountin pushed to expand its mission to other diseases. With financial support from Coca-Cola tycoon and philanthropist Robert Woodruff, the CDC did exactly that.

Did Leo Frank kill Mary Phagan? 106 years later, we might finally find out for sure.

In early may, Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard announced that he will reopen one of the most notorious criminal proceedings in American history: the trial of National Pencil Company superintendent Leo M. Frank for the murder of child laborer Mary Phagan.
Windows Speak Atlanta Life Insurance Sweet Auburn

Who are these faces on Auburn Avenue? A new photo project honors the history of a vacant Atlanta landmark

The original Atlanta Life Insurance Company building at 148 Auburn Avenue has sat empty, its windows boarded up, for nearly 40 years. Now, a new portrait series, “Windows Speak,” aims to honor the individuals who built the company, including its founder Alonzo Herndon, Atlanta’s first black millionaire.

From a church basement to a prestigious HBCU: the founding of Spelman College

Sophia Packard and Harriet Giles, two missionaries, traveled south to educate newly freed people after the Civil War. With the financial help of John and Laura Rockefeller, Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary is now known as Spelman College, one of the country’s most prestigious historically black colleges.
Cyclorama

Redeeming the Cyclorama: Why the century-old attraction is anything but a monument to the Confederacy

Conceived in Chicago, created in Milwaukee, and premiered in Minneapolis, the Cyclorama was meant to celebrate the Union’s great triumph in capturing Atlanta and hastening the end of the Civil War. But when the painting moved South, new audiences flipped its meaning, bastardizing the spectacle into a testament to white Southern pride. For decades, it was a masterpiece of misinterpretation. Now, it has a new life at the Atlanta History Center.

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