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Mechanicsville Atlanta, GA

Six reasons to love Mechanicsville

The neighborhood takes its name from rail workers in the 1880s, but it was also home to many prosperous Jewish merchants and, later, influential African American entrepreneurs.

Six reasons to love Reynoldstown

Settled after the Civil War by freed slaves who rebuilt the train tracks at the nearby rail yard (now CSX), Reynoldstown now enjoys a growing diversity, which is what prompted Chris Appleton—executive director of the arts nonprofit WonderRoot—to make his home there nine years ago.

8 reasons to love Avondale Estates

Founded in 1924 and named for the birthplace of William Shakespeare, this quiet neighborhood eight miles east of Atlanta has long been known for its Tudor-style architecture. Its neighbor, Decatur, may be larger, but the city is stepping into its own, with big ambitions for food, entertainment, and public schools.

Cruvie Clothing Co. shows off Atlanta neighborhood pride

Tony Cruver knows the importance of good neighborhoods—and good neighbors. Raised in College Park, Cruver, twenty-eight, credits strong role models for keeping him out of trouble. He’s paying it forward with Cruvie Clothing Co., an online shop that aims to spread positivity through simple but statement-making sweatshirts and tees, and collaborations with communities and nonprofits.

Neighborhood: Alpharetta

Encompassing twenty-seven square miles and three zip codes, in the far reaches of northern Fulton County, Alpharetta is very OTP. Some may think of Alpharetta as a sprawling place full of McMansions and restaurant chains, but city planners are working to create a pedestrian-friendly downtown.

Neighborhood Spotlight: Northcrest

Residents in Atlanta’s Northcrest subdivision can thank Hollywood for the nostalgia associated with sixties neighborhoods such as theirs—which have starred in countless movies and TV series. That interest has spurred home values.

Neighborhood Spotlight: Druid Hills

Atlanta might never have become the vaunted “City in a Forest” if not for Druid Hills. In 1890, Joel Hurt, who had already built Inman Park, hired famed landscape designer Frederick Law Olmsted to transform 1,400 acres of farmland into “an ideal residential community.”

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