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Jimmy Carter A Full Life

The First Campaign: An excerpt from Jimmy Carter’s new memoir, A Full Life

I decided to run for office in 1962, after the Supreme Court ruled in Baker v. Carr that all votes had to be weighted as equally as possible. This resulted in the termination of Georgia’s “county unit” system, where some rural votes equaled 100 votes in urban areas.
William Perry

Will Common Cause still be Georgia’s watchdog?

Earlier Tuesday, Common Cause Georgia executive director William Perry parted ways with the group after more than four years, the latest move in a string of recent shakeups within the organization’s Georgia chapter.
RedState Gathering

No Trump, but plenty of rhetorical red meat at RedState Gathering

The GOP candidates now have a greater incentive to spend their time coming down South to sing the praises of peanuts and Waffle House in Georgia rather than corn and fried Oreos in Iowa. The Southern right also hopes the increased importance of the six-state voting bloc will encourage candidates to hew more closely to conservative principles and messaging.

Corruption in DeKalb is nothing new—remember Pat Jarvis?

During his seven-year stint as an Atlanta Braves pitcher, Pat Jarvis won 83 games and earned the nickname “Little Bulldog” for his compact frame and gutsy competitiveness. He retired in 1974 and two years later transitioned to political infields, winning election as sheriff of DeKalb County, which already had a reputation as a swamp of corruption.

Red state rising: The last days of Georgia’s two-party system

Georgia politics in the 1990s was like a murky twilight zone with two galaxies spinning away from each other. On one side were the remains of the old Solid Democratic South, still dominant at the beginning of the decade but best glimpsed in ghosts and caricature-like light from vanished stars. On the other side: the Solid Republican South, gathering mass and best represented by Newt Gingrich.

Bill Campbell: He could have been the one

Most notable was a little-known young lawyer—a janitor’s son from Raleigh, North Carolina, who’d worked briefly in the antitrust division of the U.S. Department of Justice before being elected. He was earnestly pushing (though getting nowhere) for the city’s first comprehensive code of ethics. His name was Bill Campbell.

General Assembly vs. The General Assembly

This month, a school for entrepreneurs called General Assembly opens in Ponce City Market—days after Georgia lawmakers of the same collective name convene under the Gold Dome. One General Assembly offers tech-focused courses, such as digital marketing and web development. The other is likely to propose many things that’ll never happen.

Another debate skirmish for Michelle Nunn and David Perdue. Edge: Nunn

The hour-long session amounted to little more than a re-hashing of Nunn and Perdue’s negative campaign ads, with the occasional oddball interjection by Swafford. It would have been more efficient to stay home and watch the ads on the candidates’ Facebook pages.

Five questions the Georgia state ethics investigation of Governor Nathan Deal’s 2010 campaign never answered

The state ethics commission is a mess, its organization and reputation in shambles. It’s forked over $3 million to four fired employees who blamed a cover-up in an investigation of Governor Nathan Deal’s 2010 campaign, then fired its most recent director last month after a judge said she’d been “dishonest and nontransparent.”

New Polls; Same Story: Georgia’s 2014 races are close

At least this football season has delivered some exciting upsets and shifts in the team rankings. On the other hand, the latest batch of polls on Georgia’s gubernatorial and Senate races delivers a familiar narrative: these races are close, y’all.

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