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Freaknik

Freaknik: The rise and fall of Atlanta’s most infamous street party

From hundreds to thousands to tens of thousands, Freaknik grew, but during its first decade, almost all white Atlantans—and many black Atlantans over the age of 40—were oblivious. Then came Freaknik 1993.

The Polaris Comes Full Circle

From the moment you push the oval Polaris button inside the glass elevator of the Hyatt Regency, the stomach-flipping wonder returns. In nineteen seconds, you’re rocketed up the atrium’s hanging ivy–accented twenty-two stories, through the roof, and out into the Downtown sky. Then you ascend into the space-pod lounge, hovering 312 feet above the lobby of the forty-seven-year-old hotel.

Hizzoners

On September 12, as part of its fiftieth anniversary celebration, Atlanta magazine invited every living mayor of Atlanta to come together for a discussion of the city.

Frank Ski discusses departing New Birth, Massell on MARTA and Alton Brown hoovers up some hummus

V-103 FM morning man Frank Ski disclosed this week that he is no longer a member of Bishop Eddie Long's New Birth Missionary Church and hasn't attended services there since the details of Long's sex scandal first emerged. "I attend a different church now," Ski told Atlanta magazine during an interview at his new Frank Ski's Restaurant & Lounge at 2110 Peachtree Road. "I haven't been [back to New Birth] since all of this has been going on. It's been a while now. I think I've been waiting for things to pan out and see where they go." Ski said he and his family now attend services at Mount Bethel and at Mount Paran Church. "I like visiting different churches," Ski said. "We go to Mount Bethel and I love Mount Paran a lot too. There are so many different cultures of people represented there."

Sam Massell

When he won a bruising mayor’s race in 1969 after eight years as a city alderman, the forty-two-year-old Massell held the distinctions of being Atlanta’s youngest, most progressive, and first Jewish mayor.
Muhammad Ali Atlanta fight 1970

Knockout: An oral history of Muhammad Ali, Atlanta, and the fight nobody wanted

The notion that Muhammad Ali—a conscientious objector who was a member of the Nation of Islam—would make his comeback in the deep South at the height of the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War seemed laugh-out-loud ridiculous. But thanks to one fortuitous telephone call to a local businessman—and the political savvy of State Senator Leroy Johnson—Atlanta stunned the world by granting Ali a boxing license and playing host to his return on October 26, 1970.

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