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Flashback: John Lewis wanted to go to Congress. He didn’t make it the first time.

John Lewis likes to remind supporters to never give up. In January 1977, after President Jimmy Carter appointed then U.S. Rep. Andrew Young to be ambassador to the United Nations, Lewis joined a dozen candidates vying to replace Young. Come election night, Lewis lost to fellow Democrat Wyche Fowler. “Two months ago, nobody knew who John Lewis was. This is only the beginning.” Elected to the House in 1986, Lewis began his 17th term in January.
Willie Watkins

Meet Willie Watkins: Atlanta’s mortuary mogul

Nearly 40 years since Watkins turned a former Confederate general’s Victorian house in the West End into a funeral home, he has built a multimillion dollar empire that lays to rest roughly 1,500 people each year. Watkins organized the funerals of Coretta Scott King, Lillian Miles Lewis (Congressman John Lewis’s wife of 50 years), and family members of Usher and Real Housewives of Atlanta star Phaedra Parks.
Coretta Scott King rose

How the roses at the Greater Atlanta Rose Show get their names

Visitors to the Greater Atlanta Rose Show, hosted by the Greater Atlanta Rose Society on Mother's Day weekend, might notice that the floral competitors can have rather unusual monikers
Bernice King

Bernice King on her family’s legacy: “What was once something I resented, I now feel honored to carry.”

When Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968, his youngest child was just five. She had spent little time with her father; he was so often on the road—jailed in Birmingham a few weeks after her birth, addressing 200,000 people on the National Mall when she was five months old, marching from Selma to Montgomery when she was a toddler.

Coretta Scott King

Her husband grew up in the heart of Auburn Avenue, the center of black America. She grew up on a cotton farm in rural Alabama. That made all the difference.

Funeral

The remarkable behind-the-scenes story of Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1968 funeral.

“I Have a Dream…”

If the road to Equal Opportunity is paved with the good intentions of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center For Social Change to address the experience of all people, then the implementation of their planning must surely focus on the poor and oppressed. Isn’t that what the dream was all about?

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