Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Latest stories

Why are so many people getting rare cancers in this small Georgia town?

After multiple rare cancers have been diagnosed in Waycross, Georgia, the city grapples with a profound question: What if the industries that gave us life are killing us?
TILA Studios Daisy Chain

TILA Studios exhibition Daisy Chain is a “homecoming” of black women artists

“I want the patrons to witness the power of collaboration that is fostered through elevating and empowering the creative economy in Atlanta,” says TILA Studios founder Tiffany Latrice. “These are Atlanta artists that deserved to be celebrated, recognized and embraced. This exhibition is more than just a display of their work and craftsmanship, it's a celebration, homecoming, and induction of a community of working artists that may be otherwise been overlooked.”
Sweet Grass Weddings

Atlanta’s Sweet Grass Weddings specializes in a growing trend: tiny weddings

Their own elopement on an overlook off Blue Ridge Parkway inspired Anna and Justin Holladay to launch Sweet Grass Weddings, an event-planning service that specializes in tiny weddings (usually fewer than 30 guests). Plus: Eulyn Hufkie and Ivy & Aster help get any bride dressed up in modern style.
Winter Park, Florida

Where to shop, sightsee, and more along Winter Park, Florida’s Park Avenue

Thirty miles east of Cinderella Castle, Winter Park, Florida, promises magic of a different kind.
CBD cocktails Atlanta

What is CBD, and why is it popping up on Atlanta cocktail menus?

CBD products are popping up everywhere, including coffees, teas, and cocktails here in Atlanta. The hemp-derived substance won't get you high, but some swear by it for relaxation, or just as a fun, new drink ingredient.
John Byrne's Beatles-inspired office

Love Me Do: A Beatles-inspired home office

An affinity for the Beatles was the starting point for John Byrne’s office, where the retired Coca-Cola exec now relaxes among his beloved British icons. Cartersville-based interior designer Beverly Baribault deftly channeled Carnaby Street—circa 1968—throughout the space.
Charis Books Agnes Scott College

The country’s oldest feminist bookstore, Charis, finds a new home at Agnes Scott

Agnes Scott College was losing its student bookstore. Charis Books was facing high property taxes. Together, the women's college and feminist bookstore found a joint solution—relocate Charis to Agnes Scott to create a new community space for both bookstore patrons and college students.

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TOP STORIES

Christiane Chronices: Ethiopian food in Atlanta

Atlanta doesn’t have a Chinatown or a Little Ethiopia. That’s (mostly) a good thing.

Atlanta is a melting pot of different cultures' cuisines—and that's a good thing. The problem is the restaurants where I most want to eat are getting farther and farther away. Also: Feedel Bistro—and Ethiopian food—is for everyone.

Where to go for Easter brunch in metro Atlanta

Easter Sunday is quickly approaching. If you're still looking for a brunch reservation, here are a few favorite spots in metro Atlanta offering special menus for the holiday.

Five bills on Governor Kemp’s desk that could affect you the most

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has until May 12 to sign or veto the bills that cleared the Legislature during this recent General Assembly. Some proposals will be a no-brainer for the governor, others are marred in controversy. Here’s a look at some of the most impactful measures.
Lookout Mountain, Georgia

Vintage Vacations: The Southeast’s most legendary and long-standing attractions

Long before a mouse named Mickey showed up in central Florida, the South was dotted with roadside attractions and family-owned amusements. Rock formations, natural springs, botanical gardens, and menageries of animals were the mainstays of vacation fun.

From a church basement to a prestigious HBCU: the founding of Spelman College

Sophia Packard and Harriet Giles, two missionaries, traveled south to educate newly freed people after the Civil War. With the financial help of John and Laura Rockefeller, Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary is now known as Spelman College, one of the country’s most prestigious historically black colleges.
Georgia's heartbeat bill who does it affect

Who stands to lose the most under Georgia’s anti-abortion bill?

Legislation that seeks to ban the majority of abortions in Georgia, HB 481, is up for a vote in the state Senate as early as this week. Here are a few of the groups who would be disproportionately impacted by Georgia’s heartbeat bill if it becomes law and goes into effect.
Whole Foods Midtown Atlanta opens April 5

Rooftop brunch, multiple bars, yoga, and a veggie butcher: What to expect at Whole Foods Midtown

On April 5, the Southeast's largest Whole Foods will open on 14th Street in Midtown, boasting food carts, a coffee-and-wine bar, sunrise yoga on the roof, exclusive local items, a bike tune-up area, giant Jenga, and more.

News & Culture

With the MiniMe Factory, anyone—even your dog—can become a pint-sized figurine

As a child, Reza Nourali daydreamed of being like the Superman and Spider-Man action figures he collected. So, the 45-year-old created the MiniMe Factory, an Alpharetta-based company that creates pint-sized versions of people—or even their pets—with 3-D printing technology.

5 Atlanta events you won’t want to miss: April 17-23

Hunt for Easter eggs at Callanwolde, jam out at SweetWater 420 Fest, and try "munchies" from Korean Fusion chef Seung Hee Lee.

The Hawks might be done, but Atlanta fans should be excited about next season

The Atlanta Hawks will go another year without a playoff run, but this team has shown they're on an upward trend. There are plenty of reasons why basketball fans should be excited about what took place this season and what’s to come.

Food & Drink

Where to go for Easter brunch in metro Atlanta

Easter Sunday is quickly approaching. If you're still looking for a brunch reservation, here are a few favorite spots in metro Atlanta offering special menus for the holiday.

Atlanta doesn’t have a Chinatown or a Little Ethiopia. That’s (mostly) a good thing.

Atlanta is a melting pot of different cultures' cuisines—and that's a good thing. The problem is the restaurants where I most want to eat are getting farther and farther away. Also: Feedel Bistro—and Ethiopian food—is for everyone.

In time for the “Oscars of food,” a one-man play ponders the complex life of James Beard

Upcoming Theatrical Outfit play I Love to Eat, a one-man play about the life of James Beard, who was gay, arrives at a time when the restaurant industry is being scrutinized for failing to meaningfully include women, people of color, and the LGBT community.

ATLANTA MAGAZINE'S HOME

Love Me Do: A Beatles-inspired home office

An affinity for the Beatles was the starting point for John Byrne’s office, where the retired Coca-Cola exec now relaxes among his beloved British icons. Cartersville-based interior designer Beverly Baribault deftly channeled Carnaby Street—circa 1968—throughout the space.

How my family’s move to Kirkwood filled the “empty spot” in an elderly widow’s heart

Me and my newlywed husband moved to a Kirkwood home with its owner, the lovely Mrs. Langley, an elderly widow. One day we went out for the night and Mrs. Langley said “I felt a little empty spot after you left.” Thoughts of that “empty spot” stayed with us, and we have referred to it many times—sometimes jokingly but always with love.

With a timeless design, this craftsman-style house in Howell Station is filled with surprises

When Heidi Woessner and her husband, Jason Williams, bought the Westside lot, it was just a sloping plot of weeds with a cinderblock house. But the Howell Station neighborhood, sandwiched between West Midtown shops and the future Westside Park at Bellwood Quarry, has become a hot intown haven.

RECENT ISSUES

Atlanta Magazine May 2019 issue — The Way We Work
April 2019 issue
March 2019 issue