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Georgia was slow to spend rent assistance money. The federal government might want some of it back.

Georgia was slow to spend rent assistance money. The federal government might want some of it back.

By September 30, the Georgia Department of Community Affairs had disbursed just 9 percent of the $552 million in Emergency Rental Assistance money allocated by the U.S. Treasury Department, well below the 30 percent threshold federal officials had established to decide which ERA grantees get to keep all their money.
October 20, 2021 declared Lil Nas X Day in Atlanta

Lil Nas X returns home to Atlanta and is honored with his own day

Lil Nas X, the rapper whose single “Industry Baby” is currently the No. 1 song in the country, walked into the event space at The Gathering Spot and immediately began dancing.
Atlanta has school board elections this year. Here's what you should know about them.

Atlanta has school board elections this year. Here’s what you should know about them.

Several seats on school boards across Georgia are up for grabs in the November election, including all nine seats in the city of Atlanta. Here’s what you need to know about school boards.
12 Halloween events happening in Atlanta

12 Halloween events happening in Atlanta

Whether you like to celebrate the bewitching season with all things spooky or like to keep it cute and playful, there’s no shortage of Halloween activities in Atlanta. From kid-friendly gatherings to adults-only parties, here are 12 Atlanta Halloween events to save the date for.
The troubled triangle of Scottish heritage, Southern racial politics, and Stone Mountain

The troubled triangle of Scottish heritage, Southern racial politics, and Stone Mountain

"While history can provide an anchor to one’s soul, myths can become a kind of prison." Retired AJC columnist Jim Galloway looks at how myths of Scottish history influenced the South's Lost Cause myth.
11 Questions for Atlanta’s 2021 mayoral candidates

11 Questions for Atlanta’s 2021 mayoral candidates

We asked the same 11 questions to Atlanta mayoral candidates Antonio Brown, Andre Dickens, Sharon Gay, Felicia Moore, Kasim Reed, Nolan English, Mark Hammad, Kenny Hill, Rebecca King, Walter Reeves, Roosevelt Searles, Richard Wright, and Glenn S. Wrightson. Here's where they stand on crime, affordability, transit, and more.
Atlanta Press Club Mayoral Debate 2021 Andre Dickens Kasim Reed

Tuesday’s Atlanta Press Club mayoral debate brought out the claws

In an almost refreshing pivot from the typical discourse of Atlanta's mayoral race, conversations on crime fell by the wayside during Tuesday night's candidate debate. That subject, however, made way for the jagged barbs exchanged among some of the contest's top contenders.
Vicki Powell

DJ Vicki Powell on queer nightlife, a changing Atlanta, and the art of throwing a party

"I got into DJing because I was an introvert—really shy. But I loved nightlife, and I loved going to Backstreet. I just couldn’t quite find my groove. But once I figured out that I could throw a party with a DJ booth around me, I was like, 'Oh, it’s on now.'"
Old Atlanta Prison Farm Cop City

The land slated to become the controversial “Cop City” training center has already lived many lives

The Old Atlanta Prison Farm was the subject of an ACLU lawsuit in the 1980s. It also contains the graves of several zoo animals.
11 Questions for Atlanta’s 2021 mayoral candidates

What’s at stake in the Atlanta mayor’s race?

Crime’s the biggest issue on the ballot, but it's not the only issue. Atlanta’s transit, bike lanes, sidewalks, and roads will need an advocate and big-picture thinker who makes sure the city gets the maximum benefit from the $1 trillion in federal infrastructure cash expected to flow to states and cities.

Freedom University wasn’t meant to last this long

Freedom U
In October 2011, activists founded an underground school in response to policies that made it harder for undocumented students to go to college in Georgia. That stopgap—and those policies—have now been in place for a decade.

For decades, prisoners were forced into unpaid labor at a brickyard along the Chattahoochee River. How will we remember them?

Chattahoochee Brick Company
For decades, long after the Civil War, men, women, and children convicted in Georgia courts—sometimes wrongly—were forced into unpaid labor at a brickyard along the Chattahoochee River. How will we remember them?

Part of Georgia’s inaugural group of licensed hemp growers, Sedrick Rowe hopes to inspire a new generation of young Black farmers

Sedrick Rowe
Rowe, who turned 30 this year, wants to empower Black people to thrive in the farming industry, recognizing in it the possibility of economic self-sufficiency and even generational wealth. And he hopes hemp will be part of that.
David Cummings Groundbreakers 2018

David Cummings

Groundbreakers 2018

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