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Plaza Drive-In ends

Atlanta’s Plaza Theatre ends drive-in screenings, but fond memories of the pandemic pivot remain

As we slowly win back some of the hallmarks of normalcy we were forced for so long to do without, we must also bid goodbye to the quirky innovations that took their place. The Plaza Theatre's drive-in service is one of those.
Meet the Atlantan who's rescued nearly 1,000 cats from trees

Meet the Atlantan who’s rescued more than 1,000 cats from trees

Atlantan Normer Adams on cat rescue and conquering fears (and starlings)
Kasim Reed

Will Atlanta journalists miss boxing with Kasim Reed?

In this period between Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms’s last public address and Mayor-elect Andre Dickens’s first one, we took a moment to see if local media aren’t a bit disappointed that they didn’t get another four years of covering the former mayor.
Silas “Si-Man” Alexander

A late-stage cancer diagnosis inspires a veteran Atlanta radio host’s next step

Propelled by a late-stage cancer diagnosis, veteran radio host Silas “Si-Man” Alexander plots his most meaningful production yet.
Johnny Isakson

Colleagues and friends in Georgia and nationwide remember Senator Johnny Isakson

On Sunday morning, the family of Senator Johnny Isakson announced he had died overnight at age 76.
Six Degrees

How the entrepreneurs behind Six Degrees create incredible events for artists like Lil Baby, Big Boi, and Doja Cat

When Brian “Bwrightous” Wright enrolled at Morehouse College in 2008, his goal was to get his apparel, Kreemo Clothing, into the hands of every rapper that visited the Atlanta University Center. The entrepreneur born and raised between Brooklyn and Queens, N.Y. connected with his classmate, Desmond “Dez” Attmore, who also grew up between the same two boroughs, in the hallway of their freshman dorm and envisioned a plan that would allow them to be creative nonstop and work closely with some of the most successful artists in hip-hop.
Pratt-Pullman Yard emerges as a full-fledged arts district

Pratt-Pullman Yard emerges as a full-fledged arts district

When husband-and-wife duo Adam Rosenfelt and Maureen Meulen purchased the 27-acre Kirkwood parcel of land now known as the Pratt Pullman District in 2017, their plan was to turn it into a creative cultural destination, separating it from other mixed-use developments anchored by large retail or restaurant tenants. A trio of initiatives launching in 2022 will continue to make that vision a reality.
Alliance Theatre Christmas Theatre

12 theater events happening in Atlanta this holiday season

While last year’s performances were halted or made virtual due to the pandemic, many local theaters are overjoyed to present in-person experiences this holiday season. Here's a short list of performances for you and your family to enjoy the holiday season, including four different chances to see Scrooge’s transformation, an alternative version of the Nutcracker set in New York City, and more.
How the Board of Regents pulls the strings at Georgia’s colleges and universities

How the Board of Regents pulls the strings at Georgia’s colleges and universities

Who controls Georgia colleges and universities? It’s not the university presidents. The buck stops with the Board of Regents.
What’s the future of legal abortion in Georgia?

What’s the future of legal abortion in Georgia?

A Mississippi ban on most abortions past the 15th week of pregnancy awaits a ruling with big implications from the conservative-leaning U.S. Supreme Court. And Texas’s so-called “bounty hunter” law, enacted in 2021, has abortion opponents in Georgia contemplating a similar model here at home.

“We cannot outorganize a subversion of democracy”: Democratic rising star Bee Nguyen is vying to be Georgia’s next elections chief

Bee Nguyen
Next year’s contest for Georgia secretary of state—an enormously consequential position in a newly purple state—will be one of the country’s most-watched races. Democratic rising star Bee Nguyen wants the job.

Freedom University wasn’t meant to last this long

Freedom U
In October 2011, activists founded an underground school in response to policies that made it harder for undocumented students to go to college in Georgia. That stopgap—and those policies—have now been in place for a decade.

For decades, prisoners were forced into unpaid labor at a brickyard along the Chattahoochee River. How will we remember them?

Chattahoochee Brick Company
For decades, long after the Civil War, men, women, and children convicted in Georgia courts—sometimes wrongly—were forced into unpaid labor at a brickyard along the Chattahoochee River. How will we remember them?
David Cummings Groundbreakers 2018

David Cummings

Groundbreakers 2018

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