Friday, March 22, 2019

News & Culture

Latest Stories

Morris Brown College Dr. Kevin E. James

Q&A: Morris Brown College’s interim president wants to make sure the school’s legacy continues

Dr. Kevin E. James is the latest to take on the task of restoring Morris Brown College’s accreditation, a crucial key in keeping the historically black college afloat. Here, he answers a few questions on his vision for the school.
T-Pain

5 Atlanta events you won’t want to miss: March 20-26

Come on down as The Price is Right Live visits the Fox Theatre, T-Pain is performing his surprise new album at the Masquerade, and sip breakfast cocktails at Atlanta's Bloody Mary Festival.
Georgia's heartbeat bill who does it affect

Who stands to lose the most under Georgia’s anti-abortion bill?

Legislation that seeks to ban the majority of abortions in Georgia, HB 481, is up for a vote in the state Senate as early as this week. Here are a few of the groups who would be disproportionately impacted by Georgia’s heartbeat bill if it becomes law and goes into effect.

Pearl Cleage’s new play is a comical ode to female artists—and activists—young or old

Giving women the opportunity to tell their own stories is what connects two generations of artists in Pearl Cleage’s new play, Angry, Raucous and Shamelessly Gorgeous, running March 20 to April 14 at Alliance Theatre.
Suntrust Turner impact Atlanta arts community

Atlanta’s arts community relies on support from SunTrust and Turner. So what do the latest corporate shakeups mean?

With the news that SunTrust Bank had been acquired by BB&T and that the Turner Broadcasting name will soon be a thing of the past under AT&T's acquisition of WarnerMedia, many Atlanta nonprofits are asking questions about what these changes mean for corporate support of the arts in the city.
The Walking Dead 914

The Walking Dead Awards: Michonne’s worst nightmare

In one of the show's darkest episodes in years, we learn what happened to Michonne that caused her to be so distrusting of anyone outside Alexandria.
Peter Smith in I Am My Own Wife Out Front Theatre Atlanta

For the first time, a trans performer will play all 35 roles in Out Front Theatre’s production of I Am My Own Wife

Out Front Theatre's latest production, I Am My Own Wife, marks the first time the Pulitzer- and Tony Award-winning show has been staged with a transgender performer, Peter Smith, playing all 35 roles.
MARTA

Commentary: Only transit investment—not tech hype—can solve Gwinnett’s transportation woes

"In communities like Gwinnett’s around the nation, we’ve also seen Uber, automated vehicles, hyperloop, and even flying cars offered as reasons not to commit to long-term transit planning. These expectations are wildly inflated." An automated vehicle specialist defends the need for conventional rail and bus service.
Atlanta Department of transportation

Atlanta’s potholes are out of control. Could a new city department of transportation finally fix them?

Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms is announcing this morning that the city, for the first time in its history, could create a Department of Transportation that would act as a “one-stop shop” to combine the construction duties of three different city departments.

5 Atlanta events you won’t want to miss: March 13-19

Self-starter artistry makes one of its first appearances at the High, Atlanta St. Patrick’s Day Parade celebrates Irish heritage, and the Lucas Brothers take over the Laughing Skull Lounge.

The Legends are Atlanta’s new pro football team. But will their league survive to see a second season?

Atlanta Legends
It’s called the Alliance of American Football. It's billed as a spring developmental league for the NFL and an off-season football and gambling fix. But the history of American football is littered with pro leagues that failed. Will the AAF be different?

Redeeming the Cyclorama: Why the century-old attraction is anything but a monument to the Confederacy

Cyclorama
Conceived in Chicago, created in Milwaukee, and premiered in Minneapolis, the Cyclorama was meant to celebrate the Union’s great triumph in capturing Atlanta and hastening the end of the Civil War. But when the painting moved South, new audiences flipped its meaning, bastardizing the spectacle into a testament to white Southern pride. For decades, it was a masterpiece of misinterpretation. Now, it has a new life at the Atlanta History Center.

Georgia pecan farmers have thrived for a century. After Hurricane Michael, they’re unsure if they’ll survive another generation.

Georgia pecan farmers
After Hurricane Matthew in 2016, Hurricane Irma in 2017, and Hurricane Michael in 2018, Georgia's pecan farming industry is suffering. Georgia lost a sixth of its total pecan trees from Hurricane Michael and generations of farmers lost their crops—giving them a long road to recovery. Combined with increasing tariffs, many farmers are uncertain about their future.
David Cummings Groundbreakers 2018

David Cummings

Groundbreakers 2018

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