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Emory Proton Therapy Center opens, bringing a new-age tool to the battle with cancer

When the Emory Proton Therapy Center opened its doors on Thursday, it was already a symbol of triumph over challenges. The center—which provides proton therapy to treat cancer and is especially beneficial for treating tumors of the lungs, back and spine, and head and neck—is the first and only facility of its kind in the state. There are 29 other such centers in the United States and another 23 under construction or in planning stages. With five treatment rooms, Emory’s center is among the largest.
Emory triplet medicine graduates

These triplets just graduated from Emory’s School of Medicine—joining their family’s long line of doctors

In May, Emory University graduated some 140 students from its School of Medicine. Eight of them matched into orthopaedic surgery. Three of them are triplets. Another generation in a long line of family doctors, meet Lauren, Stephanie, and Allison Boden—the daughers of Dr. Mary Caufield and Dr. Scott Boden.
Better Business

With Start:ME, Emory looks to connect Atlanta’s minority communities with startup know-how

"Entrepreneur accelerator” START:ME focuses on small-business owners in communities like Clarkston, East Lake, and Atlanta’s Southside. The Emory University Goizueta Business School’s 14-week program aims to give entrepreneurs the skills, networks, and seed capital to develop scalable business.
Robert Schneider

Apples in Stereo’s Robert Schneider gave up a flourishing music career to chase his true passion: Math

Robert Schneider was the lead singer for his band, Apples in Stereo, and cofounder of Elephant 6 Recording Co., the Athens-based creative force behind the band Neutral Milk Hotel. Now, instead of pursuing the mysticism of music, he's pursuing something that's intrinsically mysterious and fundamentally human to him: mathematics.
Emory Civil Rights Movement

Emory students tackle unsolved, unpunished killings from the Civil Rights Movement—and draw parallels to today

Hank Klibanoff’s students are talking about running. Specifically, why an innocent black teenager would run from white cops in Macon in 1962. Simone Senibaldi, a senior, says, “The thing about running—for me and people that I know who are black—is that whenever cops are around, you run, regardless of whether you’re innocent or guilty.”
Cassie Mitchell

For Paralympian Cassie Mitchell, there are no limits

A research faculty member at Georgia Tech and Emory, Mitchell's life is a study in adaptation. In 1999 she was headed to college on a track scholarship when, literally overnight, she lost use of her legs. It took two years for doctors to diagnose her with Devic’s disease, a condition that attacks the spinal cord and the optic nerve.
Denial film Deborah Lispstadt

Emory Professor Deborah Lipstadt on Denial, working with Rachel Weisz, and the “post-factual era”

Today as we head to the polls, our heads swimming with whatever was deposited in our social media newsfeeds overnight, the new film Denial is perhaps more relevant than ever. Deborah Lipstadt discusses the importance of getting the story right on film, how she helped Weisz become her on set, and the growing importance of fact-checkers in our current “post-factual” political climate.
Shakespeare's first folio Atlanta

Shakespeare’s First Folio comes to Emory

This month the First Folio arrives at Emory’s Carlos Museum as part of a nationwide tour, courtesy of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C.
Groundbreakers 2016

Madeleine Hackney

Argentine tango is traditionally danced in close embrace, with spontaneity and musicality. Hackney, a research health scientist at the Atlanta VA Medical Center and a former professional dancer who once performed with the Radio City Rockettes, began adapting the rhythmic style in 2006 as a therapy for movement disorders.
Groundbreakers 2016

The Fuqua Center for Late-Life Depression

In Georgia one in five adults suffer from some kind of mental illness, and the rate is higher in adults over age 60. “When people get older, they fall off the map in terms of mental health services,” says Dr. William McDonald, a geriatric psychiatrist who heads the Fuqua Center.

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