After a tree knocked down their freestanding garage, this Atlanta homeowner made a fine garden folly

Originally constructed as a space for the owners’ creative pursuits, the folly has also become a destination for entertaining or working al fresco.

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Brookwood Hills pavillion

Photograph by Jeff Herr

When a tree knocked down the freestanding garage in this Brookwood Hills backyard, the homeowners created a charming pavilion—a type of outbuilding sometimes called a garden folly.

Multiuse magic
Originally constructed as a space for the owners’ creative pursuits, the folly has also become a destination for entertaining or working al fresco, says Wright Marshall of Revival Construction.

Bright ideas
Steel windows and doors—along with small clerestory windows to bring in more light—keep the structure bright and airy. Architect Hoyte Johnson designed an elegant pyramid copper roof and attached a storage shed off the back.

Refined reinvention
“When the tree came down, the yard went from shady to sunny,” says landscape architect John Howard. That change allowed the garden plan to include a small lawn and freed up Cherokee pavers from a former patio to incorporate around the project.

Garden goals
The landscape plan is intentionally minimalist, says Howard; it’s dotted with Southern favorites such as hydrangeas, irises, and ferns. A stunning view of the Midtown skyline is a bonus feature.

Designer Tip: In outdoor rooms, keep the decor clean-lined and free of knickknacks for a truly serene escape. (This retreat has hidden storage behind wood-planked walls.) Rattan chairs from Pieces and copper lanterns by Bevolo add polish.

This article appears in our August 2020 issue.

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