The North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences’ newest exhibit is a [pre]historic first

Dueling Dinosaurs includes an intact triceratops and the world’s only 100-percent-complete skeleton of a T. rex in one piece of rock

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Two Cretaceous-era dinosaurs preserved together in stone

Photo by Julius Csotonyi

The newest exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh has been 67 million years in the making. Dueling Dinosaurs, the 4,000-square-foot experience opening on April 27, centers on a duo of Cretaceous-period dinosaurs preserved together and discovered in Montana’s Hell Creek Formation in 2006.

The world’s only 100-percent-complete skeleton of a T. rex

Courtesy of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

“The Dueling Dinosaurs fossil is a scientific frontier,” says head of paleontology Dr. Lindsay Zanno, who was instrumental in the museum’s prehistoric purchase, which includes an intact triceratops and the world’s only 100-percent-complete skeleton of a T. rex in one piece of rock. “This fossil will forever change our view of the world’s two favorite dinosaurs,” she says. The accompanying DinoLab, guests can interact with paleontologists working with the fossils, test their own paleontology skills in a hands-on lab, and explore an immersive Cretaceous environment.

This article appears in the Spring 2024 issue of Southbound.

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