House Envy: This stunning Stacks loft graced a magazine cover; now it’s on the market for $950K

The Cabbagetown loft features 20-foot ceilings, custom oak cabinets and bookcases, floor-to-ceiling windows, stylish light fixtures, hardware from Paris, and an exposed-brick wall, among other attributes

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House Envy: This stunning Stacks loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market for $950K
Twenty-foot-high ceilings, a brick wall, and soaring metal windows are among the stunning features in this historic loft.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

There are lofts, and then there are lofts. This quintessential downtown Atlanta condo is so chic it was on the cover of House Beautiful, and also featured in People magazine and on HGTV.

The new $950,000 listing in the Stacks has quite a list of features, as if someone spun a list of attributes—Wheel of Fortune style—to come up with every gorgeous trait anyone could want in a loft: 20-foot ceilings, custom oak cabinets and bookcases, floor-to-ceiling windows, stylish light fixtures, hardware from Paris, and an exposed-brick wall—then put it all in the hands of interior designer Alison Victoria, best known as a designer on the HGTV show Windy City Rehab. The loft’s location in Cabbagetown near the BeltLine adds a unique layer of authenticity.

House Envy: This stunning Cotton Mill loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market
The Stacks were among the first textile processing mills in the south, says listing agent Hayden Kelly, “So, it’s this giant physical representation of Atlanta’s progression from an agrarian economy to an industrial economy.” It was also one of the first conversions to loft-living in Atlanta.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

House Envy: This stunning Cotton Mill loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market
Bookcases and all light fixtures are included in the listing. The magnificent mantel in the loft is currently not part of the sale, but is open to negotiation for selling just like the furnishings. The custom banquette and bookcases made by Hammerdesigns in Chicago. Sconces are from Arteriors.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

“It’s really an incredible merging of history and modern luxury,” says Hayden Kelly of Atlanta Fine Homes, the listing agent for the property. “The Stacks was one of the first large-scale, intown, historic preservation developments in a city that historically is known for tearing things down.”

The property dates to 1881, when it was part of the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mills, a factory that operated for decades and then converted into condos in 2007 (technically, the “year it was built” on the listing has to be shown as 2007 since that’s when it became a residential space, says Kelly, even though the loft is part of the original factory.) In recent times, the buildings have withstood a fire in 1999 and the 2008 tornado.

House Envy: This stunning Cotton Mill loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market
Cabinetry is made of quarter-sawn oak with a “brass shim” overlay. Backsplash and countertops are from Caesarstone.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

House Envy: This stunning Cotton Mill loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market
Range and refrigerator are by Blue Star Appliances.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

House Envy: This stunning Cotton Mill loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market
The staircase features an antique iron newel post with a hand-blown glass finial.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

This superstar loft feels bigger than its just-under-2,000-square-feet, 2BR/2BA size, partly because it was rearranged a bit to feel more open. According to Kelly, the mezzanine was expanded and the staircase relocated to create a roomier living room and primary suite. One of the appealing features of this loft is the wall of built-ins that offer storage and balance the high ceilings. These 12-foot-high bookcases flanking the custom banquette are made of quarter-sawn oak, which even when stained retains a rugged patina that fits the vibe.

The kitchen is also custom and high-end. Oak cabinets wear a “brass shim” overlay for sheen, with a waterfall-style countertop made of Caesarstone. The appliances include a six-burner range and built-in Miele espresso maker, with a custom vent hood showing off a metalwork pattern.

House Envy: This stunning Cotton Mill loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market
Barn doors in the primary bedroom are 200-year-old French doors.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

House Envy: This stunning Cotton Mill loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market
Custom closets are 360 degrees with rotating elements.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

For privacy, motorized shades on the living room’s oversized windows can spring up or down. Window treatments, including super-sized draperies, come with the listing. And speaking of that, the owner is willing to negotiate on the furnishings already there if a buyer is interested.

The primary suite has its own swoony elements. Two-hundred-year-old French doors are a focal point in the bedroom, separating the spacious closet and bathroom area, where solid bronze trim from a salvaged 1920s elevator lines the door. Inside, a Greek marble tub, grass cloth with bits of 24-karat gold, and a glass Circa Lighting chandelier add drama. A secondary bedroom continues the theme of using salvaged wood as an architectural element.

House Envy: This stunning Cotton Mill loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market
The primary bathroom door is lined with bronze trim from a 1920s elevator.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

House Envy: This stunning Cotton Mill loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market
Hardware is antique from a Parisian flea market.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

House Envy: This stunning Cotton Mill loft graced magazine covers; now it's on the market
Grass cloth on the walls has 24K gold leaf.

Photograph courtesy of Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby's International Realty

Are lofts still a smart investment, real-estate wise? This one is particularly so, says the listing agent. “A historic industrial conversion to a loft like the Stacks can’t be duplicated,” says Kelly. “There are only so many of those in the city, and any new construction that tries to look historic isn’t the same.”

Kelly witnessed the wow factor when she visited the property with her 11-year-old son—who was more interested in his Minecraft game until he looked up and saw the smokestacks. “He literally gasped when we walked in the loft,” says Kelly. “And when we left, he said, ‘That made me happy.’” It just goes to show that good design not only lasts for generations—but it also appeals to all generations.

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