Location, location: This Buckhead home signals a new era of family living

Jen and Adam Freeman’s city lot enabled them to build a custom family home with easy access to destinations usually accessible only by car.
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Freeman house exterior
Adam’s company, Freeman Partners, developed this Buckhead neighborhood. Architectural firm T.S. Adams Studio designed the brick and stone house—an update on English Arts and Crafts style. Dar Court Builders was also part of the project.

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

Atlanta’s reputation as a sprawling, unwalkable city may be taking a hike itself, thanks to pedestrian-friendly developments like the Atlanta BeltLine, Buckhead’s new Greenway, and the metro area’s abundance of mixed-use communities. Jen and Adam Freeman’s city lot enabled them to build a custom family home with easy access to destinations usually accessible only by car. “The PATH 400 trail is the biggest walking attraction for us, since our neighborhood backs up to it,” says Jen. “But we can also walk to Phipps and Lenox.”

Freeman family
Adam, Hadley, Jen, and Bryce Freeman (left to right) enjoy their home’s strategic location. “My office, both our families, and a lot of our friends are close by, so the location was perfect, as well as a great public school district,” says Adam. “Skyline views were just a bonus.”

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

Freeman dog
A herringbone inlay floor distinguishes the foyer, a popular spot with the Freemans’ dog, Morgan.

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

The family of four—daughter Hadley is three, and son Bryce is one—wanted enough square footage for everyone to have their own rooms, as well as generously sized family spaces. Interior designer Lyndsy Woods helped pull the look together with special attention to the large combined kitchen and living area. “The main goal was that this one large room was functional with lots of seating, cozy, and not formal at all—very kid- and dog-friendly,” says Lyndsy.

Freeman house
A custom hood trimmed in pewter and marble from Francois & Co. anchors the kitchen. Countertops are honed Bianca Carrara marble.

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

Freeman house
“Sectionals used to be not so good, but there are ways to make them pretty now,” says Lyndsy. The family room’s sectional sofa provides plenty of seating. Dual mirrored chests by Bliss Studio add texture and symmetry.

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

Freeman house
Lightly patterned drapery panels frame the tub niche in the master bath.

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

Soft colors link all the rooms visually. “Jen was looking for a soft, subtle palette that had cooler tones,” says the designer. “We used pale blues and purple as the accent colors, with soft-gray walls on the main level.” Texture and sheen provide a lot of the interest, such as aged-wood ceiling beams, mirrored chests in the family room, and a glass tile backsplash in the kitchen. The couple commissioned custom art from friend Kristen Giorgi to be the focal point of the family room, tying in the blues and grays elsewhere in the house.

Adam, who is a residential real estate developer, preferred a kitchen layout that reflects his love of symmetry. Lyndsy added distinctive features such as a pewter range hood, chunky island countertop, and a hidden pantry that conceals an additional sink and dishwasher. “The pantry is a great place where they can keep baby stuff and a bottle station out of view from the main kitchen,” says Lyndsy. “Functionally, the pantry is important with the two littles in the house.”

Freeman house
“The pecky cypress walls were the first thing we decided on in the dining room, and then the lighting,” says Lyndsy. “Since those two things are such a statement, they almost became the art of the room, though this modern rug feels like a watercolor painting.”

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

Freeman house
“Jen wanted wood-and-mirrored side chests for the master bedroom, so they were the first thing we shopped for,” says Lyndsy.

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

For more texture, Lyndsy and the Freemans experimented with numerous washes to find the perfect patina for pecky cypress walls in the dining room. An elegant beaded chandelier provides a smooth contrast to the rustic wood grain.

Freeman house
Jen spotted a planked wall for the nursery on Pinterest and challenged Lyndsy to create something similar. Wood panels in assorted sizes and colors were installed in random fashion, and furnishings pick up similar hues. Off-white linen draperies lined in pale blue don’t read as baby-ish, explains Lyndsy, and will grow with Bryce.

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

Freeman house
The homeowners commissioned their friend Kristen Giorgi to create artwork for the family room. “We gave her the sizes we needed and the overall color palette for accents, and these were the perfect end results,” says designer Lyndsy Woods.

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

Freeman house
A mud room has separate storage areas for different family members.

Photograph by Marc Mauldin

With no formal living room and a dining room that takes a casual approach to entertaining, the Freemans’ house welcomes a new, more relaxed style of family living. “I think they’ve created an ideal urban retreat,” says Lyndsy, “with the best of everything: modern amenities, views from the backyard, and city access walking.”

This article originally appeared in our Spring 2017 issue of Atlanta Magazine’s HOME.

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