Indie brands set up shop at Ponce City Market’s Citizen Supply

Three of our favorite vendors from the artisan marketplace
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Citizen Supply
Photograph by Andrea Fremiotti

Ponce City Market is home to plenty of big-name stores, but on the second floor, you’ll find something a bit more personal. Citizen Supply, an artisan marketplace, has the feel of a well-curated flea market. From tidy stalls, indie retailers spread out linen button-downs, delicate gold cuffs, handmade cutting boards, and botanical lathers. More than half of Citizen Supply’s nearly 50 vendors are local (including motorcycle lifestyle brand Brother Moto, above), but it features national and international brands, too. Vendors regularly rotate, and a full-time sales staff runs the market so makers can focus on, well, making. “We want to bring a revenue source and audience to companies that are smaller and have a harder time competing with mass brands,” says founder Phil Sanders. “Every sale at our store directly affects the person behind the product.” Here, three brands you can find at the shop now.

Apolis
Apolis boiled wool knit blazer, $295

Photograph courtesy of Apolis

Apolis
Founded by brothers Shea and Raan Parton in L.A. in 2004, Apolis partners with communities of global artisans to create and produce goods such as flannel shirts (made with a 90-year-old Honduran tailoring cooperative), wool blazers (hand-knit in Peru), and totes (handcrafted by a women’s co-op in Bangladesh). “We grew up hearing that if you teach a man to fish, you feed him for life,” says Raan. “But most people know how to fish; they just need access to a bigger pond and the right bait.”

Maum Goods Co.
Shane and Helen Kingery

Photograph by Andrea Fremiotti

Maum Goods Co.
Helen Kingery began experimenting with essential oils to soothe a number of common irritations, from dry skin to rashes. In November she and her husband, Shane, formally launched Maum Goods Co., a line of handmade bath, body, and home products made in their Clarkston kitchen with essential oils. A countertop spray ($12) contains lemongrass, thyme, and cilantro oils; the energy spray ($14) features eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, grapefruit, and rosemary oils.

Teysha
Teysha

Photograph by Andrea Fremiotti

Teysha
Travis Breihan and Sophie Eckrich were inspired on a trip to Panama, where they saw locals making their own clothes using time-honored traditions. In 2012 they founded Austin-based footwear company Teysha, which partners with artisans in Guatemala, Panama, and Colombia to design and produce a colorful collection of leather boots, flats, and sandals using native textiles and weaving techniques. “So many artisans are struggling; they’re dealing with seasonal tourism and lots of bargaining,” Breihan says. “We wanted to give them a different platform to share their work.”

This article originally appeared in our March 2016 issue under the headline “Makers Mark.”

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