Our Place in the Universe: Dead last in per-capita state tax revenue

As my fellow blogger Andisheh Nouraee pointed out yesterday, Tea Party types will never come around to the proposed transportation sales tax (to say nothing of "taxis, taxidermy, and tacks"). But really, they should lighten up a bit.
Maynard Jackson

Flashback: Atlanta City Hall, 1974, when Maynard Jackson was the city’s first black mayor

He may have been born in Dallas, but Maynard Jackson was an Atlantan through and through.

The Center for Civil and Human Rights connects Atlanta legacy and current conflicts

As its name suggests, the Center for Civil and Human Rights, which opens to the public on Monday, is about two struggles—the American one that was fought primarily in the South in the latter half of the twentieth century, and the worldwide one that involves oppressed peoples in distant (and not-so-distant) lands. While there’s an obvious thematic linkage between the American Civil Rights Movement and the broader human rights one, the line between them must have been a challenge for the Center’s designers to straddle. One has a built-in narrative, with a beginning and middle (if not yet an ending), and the other requires navigating the vast space beneath the human rights umbrella, whether it’s oppressed women in Africa, child laborers in Pakistan, or tortured activists in Burma.
Ted Terry Clarkston Mayor running for U.S. Senate

It’s official: Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry—of Queer Eye fame—will run for U.S. Senate

The young leader of Clarkston, Georgia, which has been called the most diverse square mile in America, declared today he’s running for U.S. Senate.

Five questions the Georgia state ethics investigation of Governor Nathan Deal’s 2010 campaign never answered

The state ethics commission is a mess, its organization and reputation in shambles. It’s forked over $3 million to four fired employees who blamed a cover-up in an investigation of Governor Nathan Deal’s 2010 campaign, then fired its most recent director last month after a judge said she’d been “dishonest and nontransparent.”

Georgia is moving in Democrats’ direction. For Stacey Abrams, will it be fast enough?

Someday a Democrat will win a statewide office in Georgia. It’s a statistical inevitability as the state continues to diversify. That time could be as soon as November 6, as Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams seems to be riding a national blue wave that could lift her above Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp.
Who is running for governor in Georgia 2018

Meet the candidates running for Georgia governor in 2018

With the primary elections coming up, it’s high time to introduce the fresh batch of Georgia gubernatorial hopefuls looking to succeed Governor Nathan Deal.

Infographic of the Day: How liberal is Atlanta?

Politics can be a touchy subject in Atlanta, a city long known as a blue dot in a solidly red state. It can be so touchy that some people don’t even want to talk...
Stacey Abrams Brian Kemp who won Georgia's governor race?

[Updated] Who won? Runoff? What’s going on with the Georgia governor’s race.

Neither Brian Kemp nor Stacey Abrams have officially won the Georgia gubernatorial election, so what happens now? Are we going into a runoff? What are the campaigns saying? Here's a breakdown of the situation.
Jen Jordan Georgia State Senator

The Passion of Jen Jordan: How an unlikely politician became the new voice of Georgia’s Democratic party

Jen Jordan is now approached constantly by women—“it’s almost always women,” she says—telling her how much her speech meant to them and sharing their own stories of reproductive trauma: infertility, miscarriage, stillbirth, abortion. Still, although she is strongly pro-choice, Jordan says she never wanted to be known as “the abortion speech lady.”

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