Your guide to the fruits at Buford Highway Farmers Market

They taste like cooked apple, cotton candy, or caramel custard

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Fruits laid out

Photograph by Wedig + Laxton

You can come to BuHi just to eat at its gazillion restaurants, but it would be a waste of a trip not to make a postmeal stop at one of the specialized markets that line the highway. Or you can visit a dozen such markets under one roof at the 100,000-square-foot Buford Highway Farmers Market. Here’s a sampling of the produce department’s diverse bounty, which is almost as colorful as the kaleidoscopic snack aisles.

Sugar Apple opened and closed

Sugar apple
Tastes like cooked apple, with a custard consistency

Korean Melon opened and closed

Korean melon
A cross between a honeydew and a cantaloupe

Durian opened and closed

Durian
The odorous and ominously nicknamed “corpse fruit” tastes like divine caramel custard.

Dragon Fruit opened and closed

Dragon fruit, yellow
Sweeter (and tastier) than the white variety

Haitian Mango opened and closed

Haitian mango
Mango of the gods—more honeyed, more flesh

Red Bananas opened and closed

Red banana
As if you injected a yellow banana with some raspberry

Mamey opened and closed

Mamey
Like a cooked sweet potato, with a bit of papaya

Cherimoya opened and closed

Cherimoya
Soft, slightly springy texture and straight-up cotton candy flavor

Mangosteen opened and closed

Mangosteen
Like a green grape, but more tart (and the staff favorite)

Rambutan opened and closed

Rambutan
Lychee-like inside, mostly sweet, a little sour

Dragon Fruit opened and closed

Dragon fruit, white
Texture of a kiwi, but sweeter and with little of the tartness

Lychee opened and closed

Lychee
Like a skinned grape, with a large pit—but fragrant and floral

 

Pepino Melon opened and closed

Pepino melon
The love child of a cucumber and a honeydew

Lulo opened and closed

Lulo (naranjilla)
Super-citrusy, with a hint of pineapple and the texture of tomato

Star Fruit opened and closed

Star fruit
Mellow apple meets Asian pear

This article appears in our October 2019 issue.

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