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Dr. Julia Skinner explores the many meanings of fermentation

Dr. Julia Skinner explores how fermented foods connect us to people and places

As Dr. Julia Skinner writes in her new book, Our Fermented Lives: A History of How Fermented Foods Have Shaped Cultures & Communities, few food-preparation techniques are as rich in meaning and as ripe for metaphor as fermentation. I visited Skinner at her house on the Southside—yard wild and overgrown, chickens somewhere out back—to ask what she found so alluring about the subject.
Ilya Kaminsky on dissent, war, and resistance

“Poetry now is as necessary as ever.” Ilya Kaminsky on dissent, war, and resistance

A few days after Russia invaded Ukraine at the end of February, a poem about complacency called “We Lived Happily During the War” went viral. Its opening lines read, "And when they bombed other people’s houses, we protested but not enough, we opposed them but not enough." It’s the first poem from Deaf Republic, which tells the story of people living in an occupied town who begin communicating in sign language to protest the killing of a deaf child. Deaf Republic is the second collection of poetry by Jewish Ukrainian American poet Ilya Kaminsky, who is hard of hearing.
A Road Running Southward

In 1867, a naturalist walked 1,000 miles to the Gulf. 150 years later, a former AJC reporter retraced the path by car. How their journeys intersect.

In 1867, naturalist John Muir embarked on a 1,000-mile “botanical journey” across the South, walking from Kentucky to Florida. Five years ago, former Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Dan Chapman decided to retrace his route, albeit in a car: In the century and a half since Muir’s trek, his path has been chopped up by interstates and highways—“not a lot of fun hiking terrain,” Chapman says.
Emily Giffin Meant to Be

Q&A: Emily Giffin on her new novel, the Kennedys, and speaking up

At first glance, the two central characters in New York Times best-selling Atlanta author Emily Giffin’s 11th novel, Meant to Be, may feel familiar for those of us who remember the super-secret 1996 Georgia coastal wedding of John F. Kennedy, Jr. and Carolyn Bessette on Cumberland Island. But this being an Giffin novel, the writer creatively crafts a fresh flight plan for her star-crossed couple.
Valerie Boyd Alice Walker Gathering Blossoms Under Fire

Valerie Boyd and Alice Walker: On the kinship and legacy of a literary union

Gathering Blossoms, Boyd’s second book, consists of half a century of Walker’s journal entries from more than 65 notebooks. Sifting through thousands of pages must have been a daunting task for Boyd and Walker. But the Georgia natives were kindred spirits whose partnership seemed fated—they both share a love for another Black woman author, Zora Neale Hurston.
The movement made us

In The Movement Made Us, a father and son grapple with the generational impact of civil rights activism

With The Movement Made Us, David Dennis Jr. reveals the national impact that activists such as his father had, but also reminds us of the generational implications of being raised by a man who was fighting a war within his own country.
How Georgia became "the premier battleground state"

How Georgia became “the premier battleground state,” according to the AJC’s Greg Bluestein

In his new book, Flipped, AJC political reporter Greg Bluestein breaks down how Georgia Democrats pulled off their 2020 triple victory. He chatted with us about chronicling the historic race and what's next for Georgia politics.
Korean American: Food That Tastes Like Home

The metro Atlanta spots that inspired Eric Kim’s cookbook, Korean American: Food That Tastes Like Home

Eric Kim's debut cookbook, Korean American: Food That Tastes Like Home, expands upon his family’s history, which is intertwined with the growth of metro Atlanta’s Korean population, the largest in the South.
Spring reading list: 10 new books by or about Georgians

Spring reading list: 10 new books by or about Georgians

Looking for new books to add to your reading list? Here are 10 either written by Georgia authors or about Georgians themselves.
44th and 3rd Bookseller

A bookseller boom is afoot in Atlanta

In the past two years, more than 80 bookstores shuttered nationwide. But bookstores are rallying, and pivots including curbside pickups, mobile book vending, and virtual book talks in lieu of in-person signings have become commonplace at local shops. Here are five innovating booksellers in Atlanta.

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