Get New Orleans-style seafood with a Southeast Asian twist when Girl Diver opens in Reynoldstown later this year

Expect seafood by the pound and craft cocktails

1799
Girl Diver Richard Tang
A rendering of Girl Diver

Rendering courtesy of Abri Design Studio

Grilled octopus with cilantro aioli and confit baby potatoes. Wagyu skirt steak with Thai-style chimichurri potatoes. Roasted cauliflower with avocado crema and aji Amarillo dust. These are the types of dishes you can expect from Richard Tang’s new restaurant, Girl Diver, opening later this year at Madison Yards development on Memorial Drive in Reynoldstown.

“It’s a variation of New Orleans-style seafood with Southeastern Asian spices,” says Tang, who also owns Char Korean Bar & Grill in Inman Park. “We’re seeing this type of thing in New York, L.A., even Houston, but Atlanta didn’t have a really good Asian seafood place with a good bar program, ambiance, and customer service.”

Chef Mike Yang, who also oversees the kitchen at Char, is creating the Girl Diver menu. It will feature crab legs, crawfish, snow crab, and Alaskan king crab both by the pound and on combination platters.

Girl Diver Richard Tang
A rendering of Girl Diver

Rendering courtesy of Abri Design Studio

Damian Clark, of Establishment in Midtown, is running the beverage program, focused on quick service. The program is still being finalized but will include craft (or possibly tiki) cocktails, along with beer and wine.

“We’re going to give the guest exactly what they want. We’re not talking about 15-minute drinks. These are cocktails you can get in 30-seconds to a minute,” Tang says.

Girl Diver Richard Tang
A rendering of Girl Diver

Rendering courtesy of Abri Design Studio

He describes the restaurant as having a “very citylike, modern, chic ambiance and decor,” with steel and wood elements and local art on the walls. There will be 100 seats inside, plus a 500-square-foot patio. Girl Diver’s name will also be reflected in the decor; it pays homage to traditional Japanese and Korean divers who searched for pearls on the bottom of the ocean without diving equipment, as well as the famous Japanese artwork, “The Dream of the Fisherman’s Wife.”

Advertisement