An Atlanta photographer’s “Heartbooks” turns kids’ art into coffee table-worthy albums

Atlanta photographer Heidi Geldhauser Harris is giving children’s artwork its due

Heartbook childrens artwork publishing

Photograph by Heidi Geldhauser

Photographer Heidi Geldhauser Harris has made a name for herself in Atlanta through a portfolio that features everything from interiors to impeccably lit plated dishes. With a decade of experience behind the lens, she started Silly Goose Photography in 2016, an Atlanta-based business that puts a fresh twist on typical school portraits. Her photos, which capture children and families in both their schools and homes, are meant more for displaying on a wall than tucking inside a wallet, she explains.

On December 1, Harris launched her latest venture: an offshoot of Silly Goose dubbed Heartbook. “Heartbook is a service that will collect a stack or archive of drawings and document them professionally for you,” Harris explains. “The idea is that this solves a problem parents have when gathering so many drawings from their children over time.”

Heartbook childrens artwork publishing

Photograph by Heidi Geldhauser

Heartbook childrens artwork publishing

Photograph by Heidi Geldhauser

Instead of filling up storage bins of children’s artwork or feeling guilty about discarding it, the pieces can be sent to Harris. She then photographs the images and compiles them into a hardcover, linen-bound photo album that’s heirloom quality and fits in perfectly with a stack of artful coffee-table books. (If you’re not ready to let go of the original work just yet, Harris will happily mail them back to you with your album and a thumb drive of digital images.)

Heartbook childrens artwork publishing

Photograph by Heidi Geldhauser

Heartbook childrens artwork publishing

Photograph by Heidi Geldhauser

Harris soft-launched the business in November and has already seen a positive response. She says Heartbooks were designed for parents looking for a happy medium between exhaustively cataloging their child’s creativity and documenting it in a beautiful way. “Childlike and childish are two really different things,” she adds. “Children’s art doesn’t have to look childish.”

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